Saturday Sampler: January 29– February 4

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As an introduction to a new series in his blog, Tim Challies writes False Teachers and Deadly Doctrine to demonstrate the necessity for distinguishing between good and bad teaching.  We live in a time of Biblical illiteracy, and it’s imperative that we inoculate ourselves against deception.

Elizabeth Prata’s essay, Discernment lesson: how secular writers of Biblical material manipulate your emotions in The End Time, sharpens our reasoning skills a little more. She encourages us to compare everything we read,  hear or watch to Scripture.

Going on Facebook and Twitter hasn’t been fun lately, especially for people who support some of President Trump’s Executive Orders. I know I’ve struggled with self-control as I’ve wanted to weigh in on various news stories. So I greatly appreciate Pastor Scott Slayton, who writes at One Degree to Another, for his counsel in 7 Questions to Ask Before Posting about Politics on Social Media.

In her post, Meme Theology Discernment Lesson: How Does God Choose Us?, Jennifer of One Hired Late In The Day analyzes a popular meme that isn’t quite as Biblical as it appears.

Women in Scripture: Lydia, which Persis writes in Out of the Ordinary, takes us through Acts 16:11-15 to affirm God’s sovereignty in bringing people to salvation. Persis brings out details to this account that I’d never been taught before, adding to my awe of how the Lord orchestrates circumstances to accomplish His purposes.

It’s right and proper to encourage women to read and study the Bible daily. But sometimes we simply can’t. Rachel of danielthree18, as a homeschooling mom of a six-year-old with a sleep disorder, understands the dilemma. Her article, How I’m Studying the Bible in 2017, offers helpful suggestions and a healthy dose of grace to those of us who occasionally get interrupted by the demands of life.

Catholics typically defend doctrines like Purgatory and praying for the dead by appealing to the Apocrypha, accusing Protestants of “throwing out” those books. Glen Chatfield of The Watchman’s Bagpipes helps us counter Catholic claims on this matter in his blog post, What About the Apocrypha? Some of his points may surprise you!

Can we apologize to LBGT people for our actual sins against them (and yes, Christians have committed sins against them that require us to repent) without going to the other extreme of condoning their sin? The Apology to the LBGT Community That Needs An Apology by Tim Barnett of Stand To Reason makes an excellent case for showing love by telling the truth about homosexual sin.

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