How To Tempt A Christian Blogger And Why You Shouldn’t Do So

liberal-religionThe ugly fact about social media (including blogging)  is that controversy generates hits. I regret to say that Christians follow the world in this regard. I have followed the world in this regard. A decade ago, the popularity of discernment blogs demonstrated the fascination with controversy as people flocked to blogs that called out false teachers but shied away from those that offered good Bible teaching.

There’s definitely a place for naming names and exposing false teachers that seriously threaten the purity of the church. Where would we be if the 16th Century Reformers hadn’t stood up to the perverted doctrines of Roman Catholicism? And many of today’s discernment blogs have helped people come out of a wide range of deceptions. As my readers saw this past Friday, occasionally I deem it necessary to write about controversial matters.

But we bloggers learn all too quickly that we attract many more readers when we  insert certain names into our titles. Sometimes we rationalize that, by addressing controversial issues, we attract readers who will then stick around for our more theological posts.

Only they rarely do.

Instead, they skip over doctrinal articles and wait (almost like vultures) for the next juicy essay exposing a false teacher. This craving for sensational blog posts puts bloggers in a tough position. Do we sacrifice our responsibility to direct readers to the Lord in order to retain readers? Or do we put blood, sweat and tears into writing Bible Studies that only a handful of people will bother to read?

Most of us pay WordPress to host our blogs. We don’t receive payment beyond occasional donations or (as in my case) Kindle books. And that’s okay. We blog because we love the Lord and want to help our readers know Him better. We feel deep concern about all the false teaching and evangelical trends that distract people from sound doctrine. We don’t blog for material gain.

At the same time, we invest so much time and energy (and yes, money) into our blogs that we feel discouraged when readers ignore the posts that offer the most spiritual nourishment in favor of those about whatever controversy happens to be in vogue on a given week. Can you see how your preference for more sensational pieces tempts bloggers to compromise what the Lord would have us write in favor of articles that garner more visitors?

Readers, I won’t compromise my blog, especially in this time when social media threatens to silence anyone who stands for Biblical truth. But I ask, ladies, that you might consider reading the theological posts I write as enthusiastically as you read the ones that call out false teachers. Really, the more you understand sound Biblical doctrine, the more easily you’ll discern false teachers for yourselves.

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3 thoughts on “How To Tempt A Christian Blogger And Why You Shouldn’t Do So

  1. When I see a false teacher Twitter storm linked to a false teacher tweet or article, I ask myself, “Why do I want to read this?” But it’s really easy for me to rationalize, as in, “I need to know what False Teacher XXX said so I can be on guard,” or “I need the details so I’ll know how to pray for False Teacher XXX.”

    What I really need to do is pray and ask the Lord, “Do I need to read this, do I need to be involved in any way?” This will force me to examine my motives so that I’m not operating in my flesh, hanging out on social media with a bag of popcorn scrolling through tweets and clicking on blogs, reveling in the drama.

    Like

    • Convicting point, Leah!

      Sometimes I think we actually do need to know what they’re saying, especially if they influence a lot of people. But more often than not, we’re better off studying God’s Word.

      Liked by 1 person

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