“Anyone Can Read A Commentary”

Dear DebbieLynneA.J. Metcalf, an avid reader of this blog, wrote a thoughtful (and thought-provoking) comment on my post this past Wednesday. I published his comment with that article and wrote a brief reply, but I believe it warrants a fuller response than I can provide in the Comments Section.  So allow me to quote the meat of his comment here and then offer my thoughts.

Your controversial topics likely get more hits because so many of us depend on your great research and great writing on topics, subjects that we can’t get in enough places. We depend on you and your distaff compatriot discernment writers to bring us information we need.
We can read Scripture, our creeds/confessions and commentaries on 1 Corintians 15 “On the Resurrection”. We have our Systematic Theology books for this and other great and important doctrines.
BUT, WITHOUT YOU and a few others, WHO ELSE will bring us these “controversial” topics?
Many of us do not have time to pursue these even though we should pursue them.
Because we know we can depend you, however, we know where to send our loved ones.

First of all, I’m honored by A.J.’s high opinion of me. I question to what degree I deserve such confidence, but I appreciate his kind words and his faith in whatever analytical abilities I may have. Truly, his words encourage me.

But they also raise some important points that I’d like to think about today.

To begin with, A.J. really shouldn’t be reading this blog regularly. As I’ve said elsewhere, I write this blog specifically for women precisely because I often use it to teach Scripture. Although I don’t teach on “women’s issues” (whatever those are), I believe God holds me accountable to obey 1 Timothy 2:12. Perhaps I’m being overly cautious in applying that verse to blogging, but I will have to stand before God and confess whether or not I willfully disobeyed His command. I can’t prevent men from reading this blog, but I certainly won’t encourage them to do so.

The very fact that A.J. is a man indicates that he probably doesn’t realize that women’s Bible Studies rarely provide much doctrinal instruction. In truth, most of the Bible Studies, conferences, retreats and literature aimed at women feature pop-psychology and mysticism with Scripture quoted out of context sprinkled throughout. Women’s ministry, by and large, appeals to our feelings rather than than giving us the doctrinal foundation we need.

I was nearly 50 before I received much teaching on Christ’s resurrection.  Now, at age 65, writing this study on the resurrection of believers from 1 Corinthians 15 is teaching me things I should have learned when I was saved as a teenager.

A.J. noted that most people don’t have time to research controversial topics. He has a valid point. But doesn’t his point underscore the necessity for a solid foundation in God’s Word? Good discernment bloggers address controversies when necessary, but our main emphasis focuses on bringing readers back to the Bible so that they can discern for themselves.

Ladies, I desire to give you my perspective on the various issues The Outspoken TULIP covers. I want to get you into God’s Word so that you can discern for yourselves! The key to discernment is Scripture, not the research done by an aging housewife. So let’s dig into His Word together, forgetting the cotton candy Bible Studies that keep so many women from developing good discernment.  Are you with me?

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