Frustrations Of A Christian Female Blogger (Probably Not The Frustrations You’d Expect)

Pink flowers

Normally, professing Christian women chafe at the idea of limiting their teaching ministry to other women and small children. They follow the world in insisting that we have a contribution to make to the whole church, and that our female perspective must be heard. As they see it, the Word of God cannot be fully represented without the female voice.

Huh?

Where does Scripture ever say such a bizarre thing? If the Word of God is breathed out by the Holy Spirit (2 Timothy 3:16), why would a female perspective be necessary? Shouldn’t we scratch our heads in bewilderment at the suggestion that men need to hear female voices before they can fully understand what the Bible says?

I can’t help wondering if some men — even Reformed men — have started buying into the idea that female voices need to join the conversation. Logging on to my Twitter Notifications today, I found two tweets by Reformed men, proudly proclaiming that they read The Outspoken TULIP.

I’m flattered, on the one hand, that men of their caliber would think so highly of this little blog. Their admiration humbles me. Who wouldn’t enjoy knowing that godly men valued their work? So part of me deeply appreciates their affirmation of what I write.

On the other hand, my heart sank when I read their tweets. I’d planned to write some more Thoughts About Thinking today, working through a passage of Scripture to teach women how the Lord desires us to direct our thoughts. After reading those tweets, I feel hesitant to write that post.

Most people argue that 1 Timothy 2:12 applies strictly to in person settings such as church services, mixed Sunday School and/or Bible Study groups and Christian conferences where men are in the audience. They could be correct, but I don’t feel comfortable pushing that boundary. As I understand God’s Word, women are not to teach men. Period.

Whenever I see that men are reading my blog, I wonder if I should stop writing. Right now, John is very upset that these men on Twitter have so disrespected my continued pleas for men not to read my blog that I’d consider hanging up the blog entirely. It tears me apart to see my husband so upset.

These brothers in Christ didn’t mean to cause me conflicted feelings about blogging. They sincerely meant to complement me. And I do appreciate their kind intentions. At the same time, it frustrates me to realize that men ignore my requests that they read The Outspoken TULIP only under certain circumstances. John’s right: they’re disrespectful of my boundaries.

To be clear, I totally support women studying God’s Word. And many men probably need to read the sort of teaching that I provide on this blog. Don’t interpret me as saying that women lack the technical ability to teach Scripture to our brothers in Christ. We don’t.

We only lack God’s permission to teach men. God gives us freedom to teach other women, as well as to teach children. We can take great joy in the privilege of teaching those groups. How generous He is to give women opportunities to minister to these two groups!

God has trusted me with this blog. He therefore holds me accountable to use it within the guidelines of His Word. If I rebel by willfully teaching men (knowing that they read my articles), He will hold me accountable. I pray that my brothers will not place a stumbling block in my path.

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10 thoughts on “Frustrations Of A Christian Female Blogger (Probably Not The Frustrations You’d Expect)

  1. I understand your frustrations. Will be praying for you as you decide what to do. Thank you for standing strong on this issue!

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    • Although I agree with Michelle that the men indeed are trespassing when they read my blog, I also believe I’d be sinning if I deliberately kept writing Bible Studies and other teaching articles knowing that men were reading them. Admittedly, I can’t completely previous men from reading The Outspoken TULIP, but I must keep warning them that they place me in a position of sinning if I teach with full knowledge that they are reading. Their sin doesn’t justify mine.

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  2. I very much loved this blog post and very needed. I’m wanting to do an Instagram to encourage women… wondering if you have any tips 🙏

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      • Thank you so much for taking time to reply 🙌. Instagram is kind of like twitter but with more of a focus on photos/graphics/memes instead of with just plain text. I like to make graphics of quotes, scriptures and such. Wondering if I should give a disclaimer in the description section of my account… saying that is for women only? Also wondering what to do if men follow my account (not much control over that) but also what to do if they comment on my content? Would love your advice 🙏

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      • I wouldn’t consider posting Scripture graphics as teaching. I have male followers on Twitter, and see nothing wrong with it. A blog, in contrast, is actual teaching, and therefore potentially violates 1 Timothy 2:12.

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