The Value Of Scripture Now And Then

Untitled-1

Maybe I never said it out loud,  and I certainly wouldn’t have let any of my friends hear me say it, but I wanted more than the Bible seemed to offer. Thus I loved hearing supposed prophecies in   church, devoured books on “Christian” psychology and hungered  for God to speak to me personally.

Truthfully, I don’t believe my unspoken dissatisfaction with the Bible was atypical.

Whether evangelicals admit it or not, many of them want something beyond Scripture to guide their decision making or to help them better experience God. Having spent most of my Christian life in that camp, I very much understand that perspective. People who long for something that feels more personal than Scripture often genuinely love the Lord and want to be close to Him.

I believe, however, that Christians in the 16th Century would struggle to understand Continue reading

The Relevance Of Dry, Dusty History

Medieval MonastaryEveryone raved about Dr. Dill. My friends who majored in history adored him as much as we English Literature majors adored Sister Nicholas — at least as much. So in my Senior year at Dominican University of California,  I signed up for his Medieval History class. After all, history classes with Mr. Squires in high school delighted me so much that I took one just for fun.

Dr. Dill taught by straight lecture. I’d grown used to the more discussion oriented style of my English professors, so I struggled to pay attention to Dill’s  monotone voice. Having a straight lecture class immediately after lunch in an upstairs classroom that stayed warm even in January didn’t help either.

The class bored me. Mr. Squires made me care about the Supreme Court rulings of Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., but poor Dr. Dill simply couldn’t get me excited about Continue reading

Hurt Feelings Can Cripple Our Testimony For The Lord

Untitled-1

Measured by today’s sensibilities, people would probably consider me a victim of childhood bullying. Neighborhood kids constantly called me names like “cripple,” “spaz” and “retard.” Mom intervened on the one occasion when the abuse became physical, but she did her best to teach me that verbal abuse could strengthen my character.

Her strategy probably wouldn’t fly nowadays.

Which explains the hypersensitive atmosphere pervading our culture presently. Just this past weekend, a gentleman on Twitter that I consider to be refreshingly chivalrous lamented the loss of the “women and children first” mentality. Almost immediately, a woman accused him of Continue reading

Five Solas In One Hymn

This coming Thursday marks 502 years since Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses challenging certain practices of the Roman Catholic Church. His simple act officially launched the Protestant Reformation, which restored God’s Word and basic Gospel principles to Christianity.

Five Latin phrases summarize the core values of Reformation theology:

  • Sola Fide, by faith alone.
  • Sola Scriptura, by Scripture alone.
  • Solus Christus, through Christ alone.
  • Sola Gratia, by grace alone.
  • Soli Deo Gloria, glory to God alone.

As evangelicals, we celebrate these precious Five Solas as the foundational principles of Biblical Christianity. So, looking forward to Reformation Day on Thursday, let’s listen to a beautiful modern hymn praising the Lord through these Five Solas.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Saturday Sampler: October 20 — October 26

Untitled-1

Do you see yourself as a beggar? A writer for the Logos Blog writes What Luther’s Last Words Teach Us about Prayer to remind us of a basic premise in Scripture.

Please take heed of the warning about The Homosexual Tension In the Church Cannot Hold that Stephen McAlpine gives. The same problems he sees in Australia happen throughout western culture, and Christians must face the ramifications. I know it’s an unpleasant topic, but we dare not ignore it.

Whenever Leslie A publishes something in Growing 4 Life, I can pretty much count on being nurtured with good teaching. Read Three Mortal Enemies of Spiritual Growth to see her wise application of Biblical truth to daily life.

Zach Putthoff of Parking Space 23 offers wonderful encouragement in his post On Faith, Works, the Lordship of Christ, and Assurance. Don’t assume from the first few paragraphs that you know where his argument is going. I believe you’ll be pleasantly surprised by his conclusion.

Don’t miss A Restless Evil by The End Time proprietress Elizabeth Prata. And please, apply the Scriptures she shares to your keyboards as well as to your tongues.

In his article for Gentle Reformation, Richard Holdeman uses the opening chapters of Revelation to explain how Your Church is a Lampstand for God’s glory. His view is fascinating, and should help you appreciate your local church.

Thanks to Erin Benziger, Diane Severance’s post entitled Women of the Reformation: Anne Askew in Credo Magazine crossed my desk. Severance wonderfully shows God’s grace and power in standing firm on God’s Word, even though it meant martyrdom. Will we be as faithful to defend Biblical doctrine?

As an alternative to celebrating Halloween this coming Thursday, why not celebrate Reformation Day? Stephen Nichols, writing for Ligonier, answers the question, What Is Reformation Day? If you’re an evangelical, you need to understand this part of your Christian heritage.

As a result of taking his wife on a cruise, Tim Fererra of Discerning Dad comments about things that are More Precious than Gold as a beautiful reminder of where we need to keep our attention.

Elizabeth Prata writes a second essay that warrants mention. The train is still coming down the tracks makes me want to stand up and cheer! For those who complain that we spend far too much time and energy warning people against Beth Moore, this post should be mandatory reading!

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Do I Want A Popular Blog Or A Meaningful Blog?

Unpopular Bible Study

This week has been a blogger’s dream come true, thanks to John MacArthur and Beth Moore. Can I admit that I’m glad to have just over 500 followers on WordPress and over 270 followers on Bloglovin? I’m not sure how many people follow The Outspoken TULIP Facebook page, nor do I know how many follow through Twitter.

I do know, however, that every time I write about Beth Moore, my stats skyrocket. If I add John MacArthur to the mix, I can count on perpetual views.  Readers crave articles about these two public figures.

In one respect, I’m glad so many women flock to my posts about Beth Moore. I firmly believe she’s one of the most Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: A Sinful Disagreement

Originally published April 5, 2017:

Open Bible 03A woman speaking at a retreat I attended years ago shocked me by stating: “I don’t agree with Paul concerning the roles of women.” Now, it’s one thing to dislike the gender roles delineated in Paul’s epistles, and I admit to struggling with the prohibition against teaching in terms of this blog. (I don’t know how many men read it, but I try to discourage them from doing so.)

In disagreeing with Paul, this speaker was actually disagreeing with Scripture. Her comment disturbed me then, and it has continued to disturb me throughout the years. The entire Bible, whether we like it or not, is God’s Word. As such, it claims authority over us and leaves no room for dissension.

16 All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work. ~~2 Timothy 3:16-17 (ESV)

If God Himself has breathed out Scripture, then the gender roles it prescribes obviously reflect His intent for men and women. For that matter, the Word of God reflects His intent in regard to a wide variety of issues. When we elevate our opinions over Scripture, daring to disagree with certain parts, we betray our arrogance.

Let me clarify why I call it arrogance. If we don’t believe the Bible to be God’s Word, then we subjectively determine our own moral and ethical standards, thereby making ourselves God. And if we claim to believe the Bible is God’s Word, then any disagreement with its human writers is actually disagreement with God. Either position makes me shudder!

A friend of mine often says, “It’s not about what we think; it’s about what God says.” His maxim doesn’t mean (as some have misinterpreted) that Christians ought to disengage our intellect. On the contrary, studying Scripture and accurately applying its teachings in practical ways (such as a woman blogging about the things of the Lord) requires discernment, and discernment is an intellectual exercise. My friend’s point is that our opinions don’t matter as much as what God clearly says.

Yes, God says many things that I, in my flesh, really don’t like. It would feel good to support gay marriage, indulge in sex outside of marriage, brag about my “accomplishments,” spend money exclusively on myself, and be a woman pastor, but all those pursuits disregard Biblical instruction. How I feel about those matters must bow to the Lord’s wisdom. He is, after all, both Creator and King, having full authority to determine how things should function. How can a Christian possibly disagree?

Follow my blog with Bloglovin