Loving Jesus Throughout The Stages Of Life

As a teenager overjoyed that my sin was forgiven, I loved Jesus. I had seen sin’s stranglehold on my life, and mourned over the prospect of being eternally separated from God. When I heard that Jesus had taken my punishment on the cross, I found it impossible to keep from loving Him.

In my 20’s and 30’s, life disappointed me. Neither marriage nor career materialized, and cherished dreams of all sorts shattered around me. Yet Jesus always brought me back to Himself, and I found it impossible to keep from loving Him.

In middle age, the Lord answered my longings for a husband. Marriage to John exceeded my hopes and filled me with happiness. In it all, I knew Who brought about this wonderful marriage, so I found it impossible to keep from loving Him.

I’ve barely crossed the threshold into old age. I’m closer to eternity than I ever have been, and so many things that I enjoyed in younger years now escape me. Sometimes I miss those things. But then I realize how soon Jesus will take me to be with Him forever, and I find it impossible to keep from loving Him.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Praising God For Breaking My Heart

John DrawingYesterday I read several chapters in Proverbs, carefully noticing all the verses on the sinfulness of anger and being a quarrelsome wife. I know all too well how weak I am in both areas. So I thought I approached them with humility, acknowledging my failures to honor the Lord by controlling my temper and respecting John.

Yeah,  well.  The wheelchair vendor put John in his new chair a few hours after I read those Scriptures. The new chair has multiple problems — far too many to enumerate here — that seriously impact John’s health. We’re talking life-threatening issues.

To make matters worse, his current wheelchair Continue reading

All The Ransomed Church Of God

None for whom Jesus died will miss out on heaven. Isn’t that a beautiful thought? His blood covers the sins of everyone who believes in Him, and it won’t lose its effect until every last person elected for salvation receives Him.

That assurance encourages me to keep praying for family and friends who don’t know Christ, as well as to proclaim the Gospel whenever I have opportunity. The Lord won’t return until He has claimed every one of His own. Since He has ordained that the Holy Spirit bring people to faith through the preaching of His Word, we must be diligent to evangelize the world.

Additionally, knowing that the blood of Jesus won’t lose its power until He saves everyone destined for His kingdom offers comfort. No one will believe after it’s too late. The blood of Jesus is inexhaustible as far as His own are concerned, enabling us to trust that He won’t leave anything undone.

How can we fail to praise such a magnificent Savior?

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Saturday Sampler: April 14 — April 20

Easter Cross Sampler

Elizabeth Prata, writing in The End Time, reminds us that Grace IS Amazing as she reflects on her own conversion to Christ. It’s good to look back on who we were without Him so that we can delight in how He changes us for His glory.

For an insightful assessment of 21st Century Christianity, read Mike Ratliff’s False disciples and a compromised gospel in Possessing the Treasure. He apples doctrine drawn from God’s Word to address a very contemporary problem among professing Christians. I highly encourage you to give serious thought to his perspective.

In his article for Knowable Word, Ryan Higginbottom writes Context Matters: The Prodigal Son to challenge our traditional understanding of this beloved parable.

How Do Christians Lose Their Saltiness? Jordan Standridge challenges our misguided attempts at being “all things to all people” with this hard hitting piece for The Cripplegate. What excellent incentive to live in holiness!

Maybe my French heritage leads me to recommend Sam Wegener’s The Bells of Notre Dame Will Be Silent This Easter in Caffeinated Theology, or maybe it’s because The Hunchback Of Notre Dame is of my favorite novels. More likely, it’s because we need to pray for spiritual awakening in France.

The Ligonier Ministries blog features What Do Expiation and Propitiation Mean? by the late R.C. Sproul. What a timely article after yesterday’s observance of Good Friday.

Would it shock you to hear that Mr. Rogers Deserved Hell? John Chester’s blog post for Parking Space 23 explains this jarring statement with a personal anecdote followed by reasoning from Scripture. Don’t forget to click the link to his companion post about rightly understanding John 3:16.

Jared Olivetti writes Lies & Sex as his contribution to Gentle Reformation. If you’ve fallen for any of these lies, please remember that God gives grace to repentant sinners. Then start walking in truth and purity.

Reflecting on the church growth movement, R. Scott Clark of Abounding Grace Radio cautions, Choose Your Metaphors Carefully: The Church Is A Pasture Not A Business. Having been in churches that adopted church growth models, I praise the Lord for this Biblical depiction of God’s intention for His Church.

Christians shouldn’t need Michael Coughlan’s warning to be Careful With Your Mocking: SSTA! in the Things Above Us blog. Sadly, some discernment bloggers do succumb to the childish temptation to make personal attacks on false teachers.

Let’s have a second post from Elizabeth Prata, shall we? Tap dancing on the fence confronts us with the either/or nature of following Jesus. If you suppose that you can be a Christian without sacrificing your hopes, desires and even your very life, I beg you to read this essay.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Good Friday And The Pressure To Feel Appropriate Emotions

Horrible Beautiful CrossI remember the Good Friday marches Church of the Open Door staged during the years I belonged to that church. With men portraying Jesus (carrying a hollowed out cross) and a Roman soldier followed by six women dressed as mourners,  thirty or forty of us would parade down Fourth Street in San Rafael, CA. Ending at Courthouse Square, we’d sing a few praise songs before someone read a Gospel account of the crucifixion.

Even more fondly, I remember the Good Friday plays that our drama team presented a few hours afterwards. I helped write and direct three of those productions, enjoying the collaborative writing followed by six weeks of rehearsals. Best of all was Continue reading

If You Think You’re Past Needing To Hear The Gospel, You Probably Need To Hear The Gospel

Gospel Glory

It’s Holy Week, and professing Christians are dutifully reminding themselves that people who normally sleep in on Sundays will be visiting their churches. These visitors will also feel dutiful, of course. And neither group particularly looks forward to another presentation of the Gospel, though they all expect it.

True Christians will be more enthusiastic about hearing their pastors preach the Gospel, but even then they most likely will welcome it primarily in reference to the unsaved friends and/or family members they brought with them. Often, seasoned Christians feel confident in their understanding of the Gospel, and want to progress to “deeper” subject matter. I say this from personal experience.

The truth is, all of us, no matter how mature we Continue reading

By His Wounds We Are Healed — From What?

IMG_0791Like most physically disabled Christians, I’d be quite wealthy if I had a nickel for every time someone quoted the closing phrase of Isaiah 53:5 and/or the last sentence of 1 Peter 2:24 as proof texts that I should get out of my wheelchair and start walking. Usually, the people misquoting these verses implied (whether intentionally or unintentionally) that I failed to appropriate an immediate benefit of Christ’s work on the cross.

Looking back, I can easily see the spiritual abuse I endured because people misapplied the phrase, “By His wounds we are healed.” I doubt anyone actually meant to be abusive toward me, and I hasten to defend their motives. Nevertheless, they most certainly stand guilty of Continue reading