Justin Peters Promotes The Outspoken TULIP And I Promptly Disappear

Just this past Saturday, as an appendix to his statement on why he left Twitter, he graciously directed women to my little blog. I appreciated his promotion, and looked forward to writing the article I had planned for that following Monday.

A funny thing happened that Sunday. My supposed cold started acting more like a serious illness. I couldn’t eat saltine crackers without nausea. I’m not a doctor and I don’t even play one on TV, but I don’t believe colds generally behave like that. So, as much as I hate the local hospital (our fire department EMTs aren’t allowed to transport patients to Massachusetts General Hospital), I asked John to call 9-1-1.

Two  girlfriends from church met me at the Emergency Room since John had no way to get there. Strange as it sounds, we were hoping for a diagnosis of pneumonia so that I could be sent home with antibiotics.

Milton Hospital

Selfie with my two girlfriends

Um, no. The x-rays showed that I have RSV. They admitted me immediately, and kept me until Tuesday afternoon. No chance of blogging those days!

Yesterday I couldn’t even consider putting my headstick on, so I set Youtube to auto play and watched several videos on the Ligonier channel. They reminded me what a tremendous teacher R.C.   Sproul was. And even more, what an amazing God we worship.

I won’t post a Saturday Sampler this week. Typing this notice is wearing me out, so I’ll probably do a Flashback Friday tomorrow. Yeah, kinda embarrassing after Justin Peters promoted my blog. But sometimes an Outspoken TULIP needs to be humbled, apparently. Hope to write to you next week.

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Do I Want A Popular Blog Or A Meaningful Blog?

Unpopular Bible Study

This week has been a blogger’s dream come true, thanks to John MacArthur and Beth Moore. Can I admit that I’m glad to have just over 500 followers on WordPress and over 270 followers on Bloglovin? I’m not sure how many people follow The Outspoken TULIP Facebook page, nor do I know how many follow through Twitter.

I do know, however, that every time I write about Beth Moore, my stats skyrocket. If I add John MacArthur to the mix, I can count on perpetual views.  Readers crave articles about these two public figures.

In one respect, I’m glad so many women flock to my posts about Beth Moore. I firmly believe she’s one of the most Continue reading

It’s October, So It’s Fashionable To Write About The Reformation

Reformation

Today I read two blog posts that talked about the Protestant Reformation. You’ll find both of them in the upcoming Saturday Sampler, so I’ll let you anticipate reading them for a few days. If you’re new to church history and/or Reformed Theology, these articles will help you get a basic understanding of the foundational issue that triggered this world changing movement. If you’ve been around Reformed Theology for a while, you’ll appreciate the reminder.

From November 1 to September 30 each year, I think we forget about the Protestant Reformation. So many contemporary concerns capture our attention. Goodness knows, Beth Moore’s Twitter feed alone creates Continue reading

Church History Doesn’t Attract Blog Readers

Church HistoryBetween November 1, 2016 and October 31, 2017, several bloggers (including yours truly) issued a flurry of posts covering various aspects of the Protestant Reformation to celebrate the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther posting his 95 Theses. The readers of The Outspoken TULIP responded with a collective yawn.

Beth Moore, apparently, is much more interesting.

Few bloggers (also including yours truly) bothered to cover the 400th anniversary of the Synod of Dort, which did much to Continue reading

Did You Go To Them Privately?

Powerful Word

Social media provides a platform for anybody with access to a keyboard. In many ways, that access makes it easier for Christians to proclaim the Gospel and offer good teaching. In this day in age when fewer and fewer evangelical churches preach expositional sermons and encourage congregants to understand Scripture in its proper context, blogs, tweets and Facebook posts can serve as needed nourishment to Christians.

Sadly, social media can also enable false teachers to spread their poisonous doctrines.

Since false teachers utilize social media so effectively, we can praise God for tech-savvy people who have both the courage and the discernment to repudiate their errors. Admittedly, some writers who consider themselves discernment bloggers carry things way too far and end up making legitimate discernment bloggers look unsavory. But once you weed those writers out, you appreciate the ones who stand against error and guide readers back to the Word of God.

Invariably, those of us who expose false teachers receive angry responses, demanding to know whether or not we confronted said teacher privately in accordance with Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: It’s Not About Why A Good Man Suffers

Originally posted February 16, 2018:

God Answers

Of course I’d read the book of Job many times throughout my 47 years of being a Christian, so its story hardly surprised me as I read it this week. Yet this time I noticed Job’s attitude. During the course of his trial, it degenerates from trusting God to questioning Him to flat-out anger against Him.

Job knew that He’d initially done nothing to warrant the severe suffering that God allowed Satan to heap on him. When his three “comforters” asserted that God was punishing him for sin, he vehemently denied their analysis. Sadly, as they persisted in their accusations, Job slid into the sin of self-righteousness, eventually demanding that God answer to him!

As we know, God finally puts a halt to Job’s temper tantrum by reminding Job that He created heaven and earth. Therefore He has authority to act however He pleases, and His creatures really don’t have any right to call Him into account. Thankfully, Job then repents of his self-righteousness and receives a restoration of God’s blessings.

Let’s talk about Job’s self-righteous anger against the Lord for a bit. I’d never really noticed it until this week, but I believe it holds a key to understanding the whole message of the book.

In college, a classmate who categorized herself as an agnostic summarized the book of Job as an exploration of the question, “Why does a good man suffer?” I thought of her assessment this week as I read Job’s self-righteous protests of his innocence, and I realized the glaring fallacy of her statement.

God used Job’s suffering to reveal Job’s heart. For all his attempts at piety and obedience, deep down Job ultimately trusted in himself rather than God for his justification. God used the trial to confront Job with his arrogance. Although he’d done nothing to provoke God’s judgment when the trials began, his reaction to the unfair remarks of his “comforters” led him to express his deep-seated self-righteousness. And it was ugly.

God, in His grace, allowed Job to recognize his need for a Savior. He graciously brought Job to repentance, and then rewarded Job for that repentance. The book isn’t about a good man who suffered as much as it’s about a good God Who uses suffering to show us both our sin and His wonderful grace.

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Maybe I Should Play Solitaire More Often

Untitled-1Up until three weeks before our wedding, John and I lived 3000 miles apart from each other. At about 3:30 p.m. California time every day, he’d send an Instant Message on AOL (hey, we were scarcely out of the 90s, when AOL still ruled the internet) and we’d spend the next few hours chatting online. If he had to end the conversation before Mom had dinner ready, I’d kill time by playing solitaire on my computer.

You need to understand that I’ve never had much use of my hands, so card games posed a challenge. When my sister and I played Old Maid, Fish or the few other games I could manage, she’d wedge my cards (without looking) between a shoebox and its lid,  mentally numbering the cards from her left to her right. To play a card, I’d call out the number. Sometimes I’d forget to number them from my right to my left, causing all sorts of frustration for both of us.

Needless to say, solitaire games were — I can’t resist typing it — not Continue reading