How To Tempt A Christian Blogger And Why You Shouldn’t Do So

liberal-religionThe ugly fact about social media (including blogging)  is that controversy generates hits. I regret to say that Christians follow the world in this regard. I have followed the world in this regard. A decade ago, the popularity of discernment blogs demonstrated the fascination with controversy as people flocked to blogs that called out false teachers but shied away from those that offered good Bible teaching.

There’s definitely a place for naming names and exposing false teachers that seriously threaten the purity of the church. Where would we be if the 16th Century Reformers hadn’t stood up to the perverted doctrines of Roman Catholicism? And many of today’s discernment blogs have helped people come out of a wide range of deceptions. As my readers saw this past Friday, occasionally I deem it necessary to write about controversial matters.

But we bloggers learn all too quickly that we attract many more readers when we  insert certain names into our titles. Sometimes we rationalize that, by addressing controversial issues, we attract readers who will then stick around for our more theological posts.

Only they rarely do.

Instead, they skip over doctrinal articles and wait (almost like vultures) for the next juicy essay exposing a false teacher. This craving for sensational blog posts puts bloggers in a tough position. Do we sacrifice our responsibility to direct readers to the Lord in order to retain readers? Or do we put blood, sweat and tears into writing Bible Studies that only a handful of people will bother to read?

Most of us pay WordPress to host our blogs. We don’t receive payment beyond occasional donations or (as in my case) Kindle books. And that’s okay. We blog because we love the Lord and want to help our readers know Him better. We feel deep concern about all the false teaching and evangelical trends that distract people from sound doctrine. We don’t blog for material gain.

At the same time, we invest so much time and energy (and yes, money) into our blogs that we feel discouraged when readers ignore the posts that offer the most spiritual nourishment in favor of those about whatever controversy happens to be in vogue on a given week. Can you see how your preference for more sensational pieces tempts bloggers to compromise what the Lord would have us write in favor of articles that garner more visitors?

Readers, I won’t compromise my blog, especially in this time when social media threatens to silence anyone who stands for Biblical truth. But I ask, ladies, that you might consider reading the theological posts I write as enthusiastically as you read the ones that call out false teachers. Really, the more you understand sound Biblical doctrine, the more easily you’ll discern false teachers for yourselves.

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Is Beth Moore More Interesting Than Bible Study?

Bible Turning PagesFriday I blogged about Beth Moore’s latest publicly stunt. Boy, did that article attract a lot of readers! And praise God that maybe He used that article to help people understand the value of embracing the roles He assigns women in the church. I also hope He used it to inspire people to pray for her repentance. This woman is deceived in many areas, as evidenced in Elizabeth Prata’s curation of critiques about her. She desperately needs God’s mercy.

Yesterday I posted a Bible Study working through 1 Corinthians 15, after spending a week reading it in context with the epistle as a whole and studying commentaries on the first eleven verses. Due to time limitations brought on by my disability, doing this weekly study — a study that many of you assured me you wanted — requires that I use my personal Bible Study time each day to prepare for it.

At this writing, 277 people have read my blog post about Beth Moore. Only 26 have read yesterday’s Bible Study. That disparity doesn’t surprise me, but it certainly saddens me.

In thinking about the disparity of attention between my two articles, I had the thought that if more people cared about actual Bible Study (as opposed to making the Bible about ourselves, as Beth Moore routinely does), perhaps less people would fall into false teaching. Possibly, reading Bible Studies that depend on a verse’s context, citing cross-references so that Scripture interprets Scripture and avoiding the temptation to insert oneself into the text, just might prevent someone from falling into the errors that typify Beth Moore.

Beth Moore claims to study the Bible, yet her teaching betrays her sad inability to interpret it responsibly. I’ve watched enough of her YouTube videos and read enough of her blog posts to know that she mishandles God’s Word on a regular basis (again, I refer you to the link in this article’s  first paragraph for documentation). I believe she studies the Bible in ways that suit her agenda rather than handling Scripture properly.

Hopefully my Bible Studies on this blog do handle Scripture properly, and show my readers how to  handle Scripture properly. I pray my Bible Studies lead women toward sound doctrine that ultimately produces discernment. Consequently, it breaks my heart that my readers gravitate toward posts exposing false teachers like Beth Moore while ignoring Bible Studies that could protect them from her errors.

Writing Bible Studies takes me more time and effort than writing posts warning about Beth Moore and other false teachers. But writing Bible Studies could be the most effective means of preventing women from falling into deception. Sisters, I may not be the most gifted Bible Study teacher on the planet, but I believe my studies can encourage you to study God’s Word in a responsible fashion. Maybe learning to study Scripture will defend you against false teaching.

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Saturday Sampler: April 22 — April 28

Spring Sampler

The Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood reports on the disturbing Assembly Bill certain to become California law. Colin Smothers’ article, Banning Christian Orthodoxy in California, serves as a sobering warning to those who stand for Biblical principles.

Even though Steven Lawson writes Is It Necessary to Preach Divine Wrath? with his fellow pastors in mind, his article on the Ligonier blog also applies to us in our evangelism efforts. In this era of trying to make the Gospel palatable, we need this reminder to present truth in its entirety.

I always look forward to Mondays and Thursdays because I know Leslie A will be posting on Growing 4 Life. No disappointment this week! Please read How Do I Respond to My Enemies? as another example of her Biblical wisdom.

Jordan Standridge of The Cripplegate takes the pope to task in Five Reasons Why Pope Francis’ Answer Was Demonic. Standridge doesn’t conceal his anger. And he shouldn’t! Assuring anyone that an atheist gained entrance to heaven will lead countess souls to hell, all for the sake of this man’s popularity. We should all be as outraged as Standridge!

Go over to excatholic4christ for Tom’s post, Roman Catholics and Astrology: “Am I a Taurus or an Aries?” To my dismay, I’ve also heard evangelicals talk about horoscopes as if they provide nothing more than harmless entertainment. Let me be clear: astrology is strictly pagan at best, and a possible gateway to demonic activity. Stay away from it!

Why Christian Blogs Aren’t What They Used To Be by Tim Challies examines the growing trend of vanishing Christian blogs. He offers a few intriguing suggestions to explain the movement away from blogging. But his closing paragraph, typed in italics, is worth the whole article for its encouragement to continue blogging.

In her own unique style (which I absolutely love), Michelle Lesley details Scriptural evidence that God’s Not Like “Whatever, Dude,” About The Way He’s Approached in Worship. Michelle addresses some extremely important problems in contemporary church life with this article. For that reason I strongly recommend you read it.

In his most recent blog post for Parking Space 23, Greg Peterson begins his series on Reasons to Study the Book of  Revelation by introducing us to the value of eschatology. I love his perspective that the book of Revelation is essentially about Jesus Christ.

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Jehovah’s Witnesses, Speech Defects And The Appropriate Expression Of Anger

TypingHow do you respond to false doctrine?  I get angry! Perhaps that’s why God gave me a speech defect that pretty much prevents me from talking to people face-to-face. Writing seems a better way to harness my outrage when I see people perverting truth.

I admit that when John and I wheel around Boston, I want to engage the Jehovah’s Witnesses who swarm all over heavily populated areas in conversation, if only to hinder them from spreading their lies to those who might believe them. John, knowing my explosive temper, wisely steers me past them before I can discredit the Gospel. He frustrates me by doing so, but he’s right.

Anger at false doctrine isn’t wrong, but it can be expressed in very wrong ways. So for me, blogging best gives me opportunity to condemn false teaching without dishonoring the very Christ that I seek to honor. It doesn’t reach the Jehovah’s Witnesses that overrun Downtown Crossing, the Boston Common or South Station, but apparently they’re not my mission field. My anger should drive me to pray for others to witness to them, and to write articles addressing their heresies.

The Watchtower Society teaches that Jesus is a god, and maybe the Archangel Michael, thereby denying His deity. Yeah, this blasphemy infuriates me! When someone blatantly denies that Jesus is fully God and fully Man, any true Christian should feel indignant. Jehovah’s Witnesses grossly distort the essential nature of our precious Lord and Savior.

Of course, they also teach salvation by works, just like every other false religion. If you read Galatians, you’ll notice Paul’s fury toward anyone who teaches that sort of doctrine. If we feel no anger at Jehovah’s Witnesses for propagating this damning counterfeit gospel, we need to examine how seriously we take the true Gospel.

Beneath our righteous anger at the lies of Watchtower, we must have compassion for the people trapped in it. Many of them sincerely want to serve the Lord, but their leaders lock them into an evil system that deceives them. We should grieve over their imprisonment.

As John and I wheel around Boston, I pray for the Jehovah’s Witnesses mounted in their strategic places. I pray that knowledgeable Christians who master their tempers better than I do will show them Who Jesus is and how He brings salvation to all who believe in Him. Perhaps I should also pray that I can write articles to equip my readers to proclaim the Gospel to Jehovah’s Witnesses. My speech defect and unbridled anger doesn’t have to render me mute.

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Saturday Sampler: April 1 — April 7

Spring 2018 SamplerWhat do you call home? Sometimes (too often, actually) I tell folks that God made me for Boston. John Ellis, in his blog A Day in His Court, writes Rooted: A Christian’s Place to challenge that temporal perspective. But his rejoinder isn’t exactly what you probably think it is.

Starting with an account of John Hooper’s martyrdom under Bloody Mary, Clint Archer discusses Exquisite Tenderness – Being Christlike in the Crucible of Suffering for The Cripplegate, The main body of his post draws from Christ’s attitude during His crucifixion. It’s an uncomfortable post to read, but we certainly need its message as we face the growing threat of persecution in our own century.

In How to Cheat Death, Leslie A of  Growing 4 Life questions the power of a healthy diet. She sees a much more effective way of cheating death.

I remember the frustration of being single, and thus I feel concern for my unmarried sisters in Christ. Lisa Robinson, who blogs at Thinking and Living Theological Thoughts Out Loud, writes On kingdom seeking and stuff: a personal reflection to encourage other single women through the wonderful blessing God is working in her life.

Using Titus 2 as a  template, Amanda Walker shows us Six Habits Younger Women Need Older Women To Teach Them in Biblical Woman. Ladies, all of us can benefit from the reminders Amanda provides.

Although I don’t think I’ll close The Outspoken TULIP’s Facebook page quite yet, Stephen McAlpine’s When Facebook Falls Out of Like With Your Blog gives me something to ponder.  I understand that the growing censorship against Christians and conservatives in social media is minimal compared to the persecution Christians face in other parts of the world, but I believe we should be aware that we have limited time in which to proclaim the Gospel online. Let’s not waste it!

Also in this week’s The Cripplegate, Eric Davis writes Is the Bible Enough for Us? – Sufficiency as part of his series on God’s Word. My regular readers know how strongly I believe that the Bible provides absolutely everything we need to live in accordance with God’s will, so you’ll not be surprised by my recommendation of this post. Davis makes the case for the sufficiency of Scripture much better than I ever have.

Michael Coughlan’s thought-provoking piece, Sad Facts About Racism, adds needed perspective to the difficult conversation we’re having in our nation currently. He regularly contributes posts to Things Above Us.

If you struggle to distinguish between discernment ministry and “discernment ministry,” please read How To Do Online Discernment Ministry, Part 1 and How To Do Online Discernment Ministry, Part 2 by Elizabeth Prata in The End Time. Whether you aspire to write a discernment blog or you need help determining which blogs to trust, Elizabeth’s two essays can help you develop a good criteria for vetting discernment ministries.

At first, Stephen McAlpine’s title,  The Sex Pistols, The Bible and China, put me off. But as we think about the probability of persecution reaching American shores, this article offers encouragement and hope that the suppression of religious liberties might actually serve to further the Gospel!

I certainly have an abundance of links in this edition of Saturday Sampler, but I must include That’s Not How This Works by SharaC of Into the Foolishness of God. The practice she addresses reminds me of Thomas Jefferson, who reportedly took scissors to the parts of the Bible he didn’t like.

Finally, Jeff Robinson writes Jonathan Edwards and Why I am a Cessationist for Founders Ministries to help us evaluate the work of the Holy Spirit in revivals. He imports thoughts from Jonathan Edwards, who preached during the Great Awakening in the 18th Century.

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What Writer’s Block Teaches Me About Discipline And Joy

OpenBible John 1My writer’s block continues, tempting me to take a day off from blogging. I do realize that doing so wouldn’t be sinful. Maybe I’d even get some digital art done, which really wouldn’t be such a bad idea.

Yet I fear that indulging these feelings of not wanting to blog could put me on a slippery slope.  I know my sinful, lazy self well enough to understand that I need the discipline of performing tasks regardless of how I feel about them. That same commitment to discipline helped me, 40 years ago, to develop the habit of daily Bible reading.

Admittedly, a Christian should approach God’s Word with eager anticipation, knowing that the Lord speaks to us through the pages of Scripture. It shames me that there are days — way too many of them — when I come to my Bible confessing that I’d rather play Solitaire or work on digital art. Interestingly, those are often the days that His Spirit most clearly illumines His Word to me.

Whether we feel the desire for Scripture or not, we need the daily nourishment it gives. Job certainly understood the value of God’s words.

I have not departed from the commandment of his lips;
    I have treasured the words of his mouth more than my portion of food. ~~Job 23:12 (ESV)

The fact is, Christians need daily Bible intake even more than we need three square meals a day. Sure, there are days when we can only spend five or ten minutes in the Word, and the Lord understands that. But the discipline of coming to His Word regularly, unless unusual circumstances make doing so impossible, establishes a rhythm that ensures daily communication with our Savior.

I disagree with imposing legalistic rules like “No Bible, no breakfast” or reading a specified amount of chapters a day. However, some sort of general routine helps. It’s only when you turn that general routine into rigid law that you pervert godly discipline into ungodly legalism.

And legalistic Bible reading shifts the focus from hearing the Lord to checking off a religious duty to entering into communion with the Living God. Discipline may bring our feelings under control, but it never blocks us from the joy of hearing God’s voice as He speaks through His Word. We may open our Bibles as an act of discipline, but we’ll close them rejoicing that the Lord has spoken to us.

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Blinking Cursors And Spiritual Urgency

Clock YellowMy  cursor blinks insistently on the blank page, scolding me for again waiting so late before beginning a blog post. I think back, with too much nostalgia, to the blog I used to write. It had  no real focus; I could write simply for the sake of writing, without bothering about staying on topic.

Ironically. I often blogged about not feeling like blogging.

With this blog, I supposedly have a focus. Within that focus, I can address a wide array of issues relating to Christian maturity as we face a growing probability of persecution for our faithfulness to the Lord and His Word. For that reason  I choose not to waste precious time and energy showcasing my writing abilities our playing with inconsequential thoughts just so I can check blogging off today’s list of chores.

A reader recently asked me to write more about myself. I’d love to! Being as narcissistic as everyone else online, I’d take great pleasure in rambling endlessly about my thoughts, my history and my hobbies. A few readers might even find such babble mildly interesting (though it puzzles me as to why they would).

Yet it seems to me that Christians waste far too much time using the tools of social media for frivolous pursuits and self-promotion when we have such a tiny window of time to use the Internet to share the Gospel and instruct each other in sound doctrine.

11 Besides this you know the time, that the hour has come for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we first believed. 12 The night is far gone; the day is at hand. So then let us cast off the works of darkness and put on the armor of light. 13 Let us walk properly as in the daytime, not in orgies and drunkenness, not in sexual immorality and sensuality, not in quarreling and jealousy. 14 But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires. ~~Romans 13:11-14 (ESV)

Christ is returning at any moment, and the present state of the world leads me to believe that He will come within the next few decades. Yes, I could be wrong. But if I’m right, we have serious work to do. Why fritter away my blog posts trying to impress you with my command of the English language when I could direct your attention to the Lord Jesus Christ?  C’mon, really!

To be honest, I think I write better when I write for my selfish pleasure. But I don’t think that possibility ought to lure me away from using this blog to exalt and honor Christ. In the short run, I may compose something enjoyable to read that reflects back to me, but such an essay would certainly have no eternal value. Why should I waste my time on that nonsense when we have so little time left before Jesus is banned from social media.

My blinking cursor, with all its urgent impatience, reminds me that time passes rapidly. I wasted too much time in youth and middle age using my writing to draw attention to myself. Let this blinking cursor encourage me to invest in the treasures of eternity.

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