Committed To The Scripture

The Reformation happened, at its core, because men and women went back to the Bible. They measured the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church against God’s Word, and consequently rejected the false teaching that Christians need to supplement faith with works in order to even hope for salvation. These brave Reformers risked — and sometimes sacrificed — their lives because they were committed to the Scripture.

What a powerful example for us to follow! All glory goes to God, Who taught them to have faith alone in grace alone through Christ alone depending on Scripture alone. As we celebrate the 502nd anniversary of the Protestant Reformation this month, may our gracious Lord keep us committed to the Scripture.

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I Didn’t Do Anything

How many times have you heard your kids object to discipline by protesting, “I didn’t do anything,” when it’s all too clear that they’ve done something wrong?  How many times have you made the same declaration?

We all want to escape personal responsibility.

Yet when we do something right (or appear to do something right), we do our best to make sure people know about it. In those cases, we’re perfectly happy to claim as much responsibility as we possibly can. Especially when it comes to our salvation.

But the truth humbles us as we see Christ’s complete mastery over our salvation. From beginning to end, He provides the grace. He even gives us the ability to believe in Him! As a result, He receives all the praise and glory. We didn’t do anything!

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All The Superlatives In The World Couldn’t Describe Him

Why would our perfect and holy God be pleased with our feeble attempts at worshiping Him? Even a lofty hymn like Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise — with its majestic lyrics and soaring music — falls short or adequately describing Him. Even if we mastered every language in existence, our words would fall terribly short of capturing His grandeur.

And yet He graciously accepts the praises of His people. He calls us to dwell on His attributes in order that we might focus on Him. Thus, hymns like Immortal, Invisible direct our gazes upward, filling us with wonder as we try to rehearse His innumerable splendors.

Eternity will fully reveal the Lord in all of His glory. No more will the tarnish of sin obscure Him from our sight! In some respects, the limitations of human language will melt into praise and worship far beyond anything that we could possibly imagine. At last, we will enjoy unhindered worship, praising Him with a depth and richness that eludes our current understanding.

Even then, our words probably won’t begin to describe Him.

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And Speaking Of The Church

After writing a series of posts about the church, only one hymn seems fitting. The hymn writer shifts the focus from the church itself to the One Who established the church as His bride.

Usually, I introduce Sunday hymns with lengthy musings on them, and usually doing so has merit. In this case, however, the hymn simply provides a conclusion to my series. May we remember that the church belongs to Christ and exists for His glory.

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Before You Get Excited About Any Possible Articles On Jackie Hill Perry, Think Carefully About Why You Want Them

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Jackie Hill Perry is a problem — I get that. I understand the importance of researching her and warning people to avoid her, just as I’ve warned against Sarah Young, Ann Voskamp, Joyce Meyer and (especially) Beth Moore. Scripture mandates that we mark false teachers who divide the Body Of Christ from sound doctrine.

17 I appeal to you, brothers, to watch out for those who cause divisions and create obstacles contrary to the doctrine that you have been taught; avoid them. 18 For such persons do not serve our Lord Christ, but their own appetites, and by smooth talk and flattery they deceive the hearts of the naive. ~~Romans 16:17-18 (ESV)

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What Constitutes A Glorious Day?

This past Thursday John and I went into Boston — for no other reason than to enjoy the perfect weather. After spending an hour at the Museum of Fine Arts, we went to Downtown Crossing, and wandered up Washington Street. We stopped at B.Good for lunch, where we shared the absolute best chocolate shake I’ve ever tasted. We then wheeled to Quincy Market to buy our annual bag of Ghriradelli chocolates and a 2020 Boston calendar before going down the Greenway to catch the early train home.

It was a glorious day!

Yet maybe calling it glorious trivializes the word “glorious.” As much as Thursday delighted us, it pales in comparison to the truly glorious day when Jesus will return for  His beloved Church. I don’t think I’m alone in failing to comprehend the thrill that day will bring. But I definitely know that when I see Him coming in the clouds, I’ll wonder why I ever thought a Thursday in Boston was glorious.

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Flashback Friday: A Wife, Sister And Aunt — But Am I Like The Trinity?

Originally posted January 30, 2018:

Shamrock ShadedThroughout church history, people have attempted to explain the Trinity. Patrick, the 5th Century missionary to Ireland, famously used the shamrock to illustrate how God can be three distinct Persons and yet one Being. Others have likened the Trinity to H2O (water, ice and vapor) or and egg (shell,  white and yoke). There are other analogies, most of which I happily don’t remember.

A friend recently reminded me of an analogy that used to be my favorite. I would explain that, though I’m DebbieLynne in all situations, I am a wife, a sister and an aunt. As such, I have three different roles. Ignore all my other roles (friend, employer, niece, blogger, church member, patient to my doctors and  so on).

Obviously the analogy breaks down very quickly. And it should for a few reasons. Two of those reasons particularly trouble me, and I think they should trouble most Christians who really give serious thought to their implications.

Firstly, my roles as wife, sister and aunt depend on how my husband, sister and nieces are related to me. Apart from John, I would not be a wife. If John dies before I do, I will cease to be a wife. Therefore, my identity as wife relies completely on John rather than being intrinsic to my nature.

Yet the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit exist independently of Their roles in relating to the Church. They have definite roles in bringing about salvation and in sanctifying believers, certainly, and we ought to rejoice in how intimately each Person of the Trinity works in our lives. But if God had never created anything, each Person of the Trinity would still exist in His fullness, not needing us to define Him. My various roles hinge on my relationships with others, but God is Father, Son and Spirit eternally, with or without us.

Secondly, and more importantly, it borders on blasphemy to compare ourselves to the Triune God. I tremble in shame at the thought that I ever did such a presumptuous thing! Although He created us in His likeness, we cannot — and indeed, must not  — consider ourselves models for describing anything about Him. Especially the Holy Trinity!

God commands Christians to reflect His character qualities like love, righteousness, patience and above all holiness. But He never suggested that anything about us could explain His very essence. My roles as wife, sister and aunt in no way demonstrate the astounding mystery of the Holy Trinity, and God never intended them to do so. Again, the very idea creeps dangerously close to blasphemy, in my opinion.

Many non-Christians dare us to defend the doctrine of the Trinity because they view it as illogical. Consequently, we concoct analogies that seem nifty, supposing that we can convince people with our little illustrations. But in truth, the Trinity lies well beyond the grasp of human reason. Instead of presuming to explain God’s triune nature, maybe we should stand in awe of this marvelous mystery.