Giving Thanks Should Have A Direction

2004_0810Plymouth0052Does anyone seriously deny that America has become a secular society?  On the local news this morning, for instance, reporters had difficulty concealing their celebratory attitudes as the first shops to legally sell recreational marijuana opened at 8:00 a.m. today. Two of them. Only shops on the East Coast. Right here in Massachusetts! I grieved over the obvious disregard for God’s standards of sobriety.

Not long after running the story showing the massive amount of people lining up to buy their legal pot, the station ran another story predicting the massive amount of people who will be traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday. Maybe I have a quirky way of viewing things, but it struck me as odd that Americans thumb their noses at the God of the Bible as they flock to celebrate a holiday originally intended as worship for His care and provision.

The Christians who celebrated that first American Thanksgiving (right here in Massachusetts, by the way), called for the feast as an expression of thanks to the Lord for sustaining them through that harsh New England winter and for the abundant harvest that ensuing Fall. (Do public schools still teach that part of American history?) Their thankfulness was more than a nebulous gratitude directed at nobody in particular, but heartfelt thankfulness to a personal Lord Who had lovingly taken care of them.

It’s important to count our blessings. Absolutely! In some ways,  I suppose it’s good that secular people step back and recognize the value of being grateful to something beyond themselves.

At the same time, I feel troubled that so many Americans have such enthusiasm about the Thanksgiving holiday when they demonstrate a total lack of interest in God Himself. As I see it, their nebulous gratitude lacks the beauty and depth of praising the glorious Lord Jesus Christ.

There is none like you among the gods, O Lord,
    nor are there any works like yours.
All the nations you have made shall come
    and worship before you, O Lord,
    and shall glorify your name.
10 For you are great and do wondrous things;
    you alone are God.
11 Teach me your way, O Lord,
    that I may walk in your truth;
    unite my heart to fear your name.
12 I give thanks to you, O Lord my God, with my whole heart,
    and I will glorify your name forever.
13 For great is your steadfast love toward me;
    you have delivered my soul from the depths of Sheol. ~~Psalm 86:8-13 (ESV)

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Ironic Attitudes At Thanksgiving

Untitled-1Eight weeks ago, I turned 65. Almost on cue, my aches and pains accelerated and circumstances limited my recreational opportunities (New England, of all places, bypassed Fall this year, with winter beginning immediately after my birthday).

And I’ve been complaining. A lot!

Okay, so I don’t like my present circumstances. I feel cheated by a hot, rainy summer followed by a cold, rainy October and a rainy, snowy November that kept me from going to Boston more than a handful of times. And I’m decidedly displeased that I rarely feel well physically. I keep remembering my mother-in-law looking me in the eye one afternoon and Continue reading

Looking At The Cross Costs Something

When you first heard that Jesus died for your sins, how did you respond? Did you shrug it off as a somewhat perplexing idea? Maybe you felt a measure of relief, but didn’t really think the knowledge of His sacrifice required more than a thank you and a smile from you. Perhaps you thought you needed to augment His work on the cross, making yourself worthy of salvation.

Or maybe you had comprehended the true weight of your sins against a holy God, and therefore received the message of the cross with an attitude of grateful amazement. You wondered why the Lord would bestow such grace on you. And, although you realized your total inability to pay Him back for His grace and mercy, you wanted to show your  gratitude by acknowledging His claim on your whole life.

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Reformation Day Is Like Christmas (At Least For Reformed Bloggers)

Reformation Day

Pastors must feel a sense of panic each December, knowing they’ll need to preach Christmas sermons the Sunday before Christmas as well as Christmas Eve. How can they find a fresh angle? What can they say that pastors haven’t said for centuries on end? How do they keep their congregations from becoming jaded to the wonder of Christ’s Incarnation?

As a blogger, I believe I empathize with their plight. Before starting The Outspoken TULIP, I maintained another blog for  nine years, giving me a total of twelve years and three months doing this ministry. Around Christmastime, I panic a little myself. What can I add to the conversation that’s different from my Christmas blog posts lying in my archives? And how can my articles complement, rather than parrot, those of my fellow Christian bloggers?

Today I feel the same sort of panic. It’s Reformation Day, and I am Continue reading

Saturday Sampler: October 14 — October 20

Autumn Leaves Sampler

Clint Archer of The Cripplegate answers the question,  How is God the Savior of all people? (in 500 words). This article helps those of us who are challenged for embracing Reformed Theology.

I haven’t fully vetted the Spirit Of Error website, but Holly Pivec’s ‘Eat the meat and spit out the bones’: A proper response to NAR teaching? makes some excellent points. I especially like her closing milkshake analogy.

In Isaac’s Dilemma, Michael Coughlan of Things Above Us writes about a young man he encountered while doing open air evangelism. What Michael shares warrants our attention for a variety of reasons.

On his Delivered By Grace blog (which I don’t read often enough), Josh Buice examines The Rise in Women Preachers and What You Should Know. As Bible-believing Christians,  we should be aware of this trend. And we should be troubled.

Adapting a commentary by the late R.C. Sproul, the Ligonier blog examines the question, Where Does Ultimate Authority Lie? I particularly appreciate the brief explanation of hermeneutics and proper Bible interpretation.

You might want to read Unaware of Our Slavery, which Laura Lundgrin posts on the Servants of Grace blog to help us realize the danger of entertaining temptation. She lets us see why even the most gentle princess shouldn’t presume that she can tame a baby dragon.

If you’ve been following the Social Justice Movement among evangelicals, you may want to go over to Pyromaniacs and read What Did Jesus Say about “Social Justice?” by Colin Eakin. He demonstrates that Scripture is remarkably clear on the topic.

An incident with one of her employees led Leslie A of Growing 4 Life to write Are You Mowing the Wrong Lawn? In this short, entertaining post, she shows us the best means of determining whether or not we’ve been exposed to false teaching.

Want some excitement in your personal Bible study? Peter Krol’s article, What to Do When the New Testament Quotes the Old Testament in Knowable Word, certainly delivers a thrilling concept for better understanding how God’s Word works as a whole. I’m definitely looking forward to putting his principles into practice!

Australia has followed the United States in legalizing same sex marriage, and it’s experiencing the same terrible consequences. In Let’s Rip The Band-Aid Off Quickly, Stephen McAlpine alerts us to the disastrous fallout caused by the normalization of homosexuality.

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Saturday Sampler: October 7 — October 13

Symetry Sampler 02Looking at how believers should handle personal sin, Mike Ratliff of Possessing the Treasure rhetorically asks, Do genuine Christians need to confess their sins and seek forgiveness and cleansing? You undoubtedly know the short answer, but Ratliff provides Scriptural substantiation for that answer.

As happens every October, Reformed writers turn their attention to the 16th Century. You’ll see plenty of articles about Luther and Calvin, which makes Steven J. Lawson’s Zurich Revolutionary: Ulrich Zwingli so refreshing. You can find this article on the Ligonier blog.

Leslie A, in Growing 4 Life, passionately declares I’m Not the One Who Moved. She addresses quite a few problems in present-day evangelicalism, rightly tracing them back to an abandonment of three of the five Solas.

As the owner of Berean Research, Amy Spreeman is Holding On to Scripture as she reevaluates the role and implementation of discernment ministry. Join me in praying for Amy and her blogging partner Marsha West as they go through this season of searching God’s Word for wisdom.

Complementing Amy’s post, SlimJim of The Domain for Truth writes Beyond cage stage: Beware of being a Nurmagomedov rage phase Calvinist/Apologist. Given the angry climate on social media these days, all of us could probably benefit from his counsel.

I’m happy to share Who will separate us from the love of Christ? by Mike Ratliff. Although I’ve already placed an article of his in this edition of Saturday Sampler, the Perseverance of the Saints is taught so seldom that I adamantly believe as many people as possible need exposure to this encouraging doctrine.

C.T. Adams of Faith Contender answers a question about Universal Consciousness with a compelling argument for loving God with our minds.

Reflecting on an encounter she had with morning glories, Elizabeth Prata reprises Why can’t they see she’s a false teacher? One reason: “Deception by investment” in The End Time. If you’ve ever experienced backlash for warning someone about a popular teacher, this essay will encourage you.

History really doesn’t have to be boring. And even church history can include a little romance. Don’t believe me? Then check out Simonetta Carr’s Anne Bohemia and her Multilingual Scriptures on Place for Truth and prepare to enjoy a wonderful love story. As an added bonus, you’ll learn some lesser known tidbits about things leading up to the Reformation.

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Enough To Make Me Tremble

A few evenings ago, I resumed reading Biblical Doctrine by John MacArthur and Richard Mayhue after taking a summer break from it. I read the section on Christ’s trial,  suffering and crucifixion.  As I neared the end of the section, the emphasis on Christ’s willingness to endure all that physical, emotional and spiritual pain to redeem worthless sinners — even a worthless sinner named DebbieLynne — shook me to the core!

I trembled at the seriousness of my sin, because it required the Creator of heaven and earth to go through such undeserved torment. I trembled at the knowledge that I deserve the brutal treatment that He received.

But I also trembled with joy and gratitude. What tremendous love the Lord has for His people! For me! Often, I become so accustomed to the Gospel that I numb myself to the realities of everything Jesus suffered in order to accomplish my salvation. Reading that book reminded me of how deeply and sacrificially He loves me.

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