Category Archives: Treasuring God’s Word

“But My Experience Is CHRISTIAN!”

Experience Bible

If you want attention on Facebook, simply post something to the effect that God no longer speaks directly to people. Even better, include a quote by Justin Peters. You’ll get impassioned (though occasionally nasty) diatribes in your comments feed for days!

Once in a while, someone will argue from Scripture. I respect such people, even if I disagree with their application of God’s Word. At least they want to remain Biblical in their stand for continualist teaching.

The vast majority of continualists, however, rely primarily on their personal experiences to refute the notion that Continue reading

Is That All There Is?

cInexhaustible BibleI’ve thought further about the idea that a Christian blogger can say everything there is to say. In one respect, I suppose I understand that sentiment. After all, we don’t want to wander outside of Scriptural boundaries. Let me say that more strongly and precisely: we dare not wander beyond God’s Word!

At the same time, we need to ask ourselves if we can really exhaust the Bible. Just reading that question should cause an embarrassed shuffling of feet and perhaps a little blushing. Continue reading

Excuse Me, Could You Repeat That Please?

Repetitive BiblesSome may think John MacArthur’s current radio series on 2 Peter 1 inspired what I’m about to say. No. I’ve been thinking about this matter for a few months as I’ve watched some fellow bloggers put away their blogs.

I respect them for doing so because of health concerns and/or family commitments. Both are much higher priorities than blogging, and most readers understand that. The same goes for those who need to redirect their time and energy into serving God through their local churches.

It bugs me, however, when they add that they’ve said everything they can say. Sure, within our niche of Bible study and discernment, we can’t avoid repeating the same thoughts time and again. There’s only so much to say.

But over the past six weeks I’ve subscribed to a secular blog about blogging. Although I’m learning a lot from that blog (and have implemented some of its ideas), I’ve noticed Continue reading

Saturday Sampler: June 24 — June 30

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In The Domain for Truth, SlimJim writes a short, thought-provoking article entitled VBS and thought about Christian Unity. It’s such a simple concept. But I think its simplicity is precisely what makes it so brilliant!

How are you doing when it comes to reading your Bible daily? Allen Nelson IV, writing for Things Above Us, decided to read his Bible every day after being convicted to do so back in 2008. Now he encourages us to follow suit with 5 Reflections from 10 Years of Daily Bible Reading. If you struggle in this spiritual discipline, this post will definitely give you hope!

If you want some encouraging news regarding freedom of religion, you’ll want to read Supreme Court vacates lower court’s verdict again florist by Denny Burk. I certainly didn’t expect this ruling.

Responding to recent attempts to suppress literary works that contain elements of racism, SharaC of Into the Foolishness of God speaks up In Defense Of That Little House On The Prairie to demonstrate that we shouldn’t try to rewrite history simply for political correctness. Perhaps we get offended too easily these days.

Writing for Whole Magazine, Jessica Hageman explores How Our Incorrect View of Good Affects Our Daily Lives in a way that makes theology practical. It’s tempting, I know, to regard doctrine and Bible Study as irrelevant to our everyday lives, which is precisely why Jessica’s perspective is so necessary. I recommend her article with my whole heart.

Phil Newton’s piece in Founders Ministries examines the claim of personal revelation when people say God Told Me… with an incident from the Reformation. Okay, you don’t like history. I know that. But give it a chance by reading what Newton has to say. You just might discover that discernment ministry isn’t a new invention.

Usually, you can regard the links in Saturday Sampler as endorsements of the blogs I cite (which is why I no longer include links to The Gospel Coalition Blog). I have reservations about Kristen Wetherell as well, but some of her posts deserve recommendation. 14 Ideas to Make Your Bible Reading More Consistent is one such post because it encourages us to get into God’s Word regularly. So if you struggle in reading your Bible on a consistent basis, this one is definitely worth reading.

Leslie A of Growing 4 Life tells us precisely what we need Before We Can Learn to Discern. I know from experience that this isn’t a popular approach to discernment ministry, but ladies, Leslie speaks truth here! Please, if you desire to be discerning, take her words to heart.

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Saturday Sampler: June 10 — June 16

Flower SamplerAnswering a question from one of her readers, Michelle Lesley writes The Mailbag: How can I grow to love Jesus more? As she says, more Christians should ask that question.

If you’ve ever tried raising questions about certain popular Christian teachers, you’ll quickly learn that they are The Untouchables. Criticism of them is simply not tolerated by their followers, as Leslie A of Growing 4 Life testifies. She also has an important caution for those who follow Biblically sound teachers.

The purveyor of Biblical Beginnings writes Twisted Tuesday – Cosmic Child Abuse in defense of the doctrine of penal substantiation. I love her passion for the Gospel in this piece, and I wish more Christians would exhibit this kind of passion!

Writing for Unlocking the Bible, Brittany suggests 10 Practical Ways to Treasure Christ based on Psalm 119. Since John and I are currently going through this psalm together in our morning devotions, this blog post particularly interests me. Perhaps the Lord will also encourage you through her insights and ideas.

Josh Buice of Delivered By Grace absolutely nails in his piece, Why Electing a Woman as the President of the Southern Baptist Convention is a Bad Idea. It didn’t happen this year. Let’s pray it never does.

I must recommend a second Michelle Lesley post this week. In Basic Training: The Great Commission, Michelle walks us through a familiar Scripture passage to remind us of Christ’s command to His Church after He rose from the dead. Sadly, many 21st Century evangelicals don’t know what The Great Commission is. Take her poll and then refresh your memory by reading the rest of her article.

On the Ligonier blog, Sinclair Ferguson answers the question, What Is Discernment? I believe more people (particularly those who claim to be in discernment ministry) ought to read his words and give serious thought to them. As I’ve said numerous times, Biblical discernment extends far beyond exposing false teachers.

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Is Beth Moore More Interesting Than Bible Study?

Bible Turning PagesFriday I blogged about Beth Moore’s latest publicly stunt. Boy, did that article attract a lot of readers! And praise God that maybe He used that article to help people understand the value of embracing the roles He assigns women in the church. I also hope He used it to inspire people to pray for her repentance. This woman is deceived in many areas, as evidenced in Elizabeth Prata’s curation of critiques about her. She desperately needs God’s mercy.

Yesterday I posted a Bible Study working through 1 Corinthians 15, after spending a week reading it in context with the epistle as a whole and studying commentaries on the first eleven verses. Due to time limitations brought on by my disability, doing this weekly study — a study that many of you assured me you wanted — requires that I use my personal Bible Study time each day to prepare for it.

At this writing, 277 people have read my blog post about Beth Moore. Only 26 have read yesterday’s Bible Study. That disparity doesn’t surprise me, but it certainly saddens me.

In thinking about the disparity of attention between my two articles, I had the thought that if more people cared about actual Bible Study (as opposed to making the Bible about ourselves, as Beth Moore routinely does), perhaps less people would fall into false teaching. Possibly, reading Bible Studies that depend on a verse’s context, citing cross-references so that Scripture interprets Scripture and avoiding the temptation to insert oneself into the text, just might prevent someone from falling into the errors that typify Beth Moore.

Beth Moore claims to study the Bible, yet her teaching betrays her sad inability to interpret it responsibly. I’ve watched enough of her YouTube videos and read enough of her blog posts to know that she mishandles God’s Word on a regular basis (again, I refer you to the link in this article’s  first paragraph for documentation). I believe she studies the Bible in ways that suit her agenda rather than handling Scripture properly.

Hopefully my Bible Studies on this blog do handle Scripture properly, and show my readers how to  handle Scripture properly. I pray my Bible Studies lead women toward sound doctrine that ultimately produces discernment. Consequently, it breaks my heart that my readers gravitate toward posts exposing false teachers like Beth Moore while ignoring Bible Studies that could protect them from her errors.

Writing Bible Studies takes me more time and effort than writing posts warning about Beth Moore and other false teachers. But writing Bible Studies could be the most effective means of preventing women from falling into deception. Sisters, I may not be the most gifted Bible Study teacher on the planet, but I believe my studies can encourage you to study God’s Word in a responsible fashion. Maybe learning to study Scripture will defend you against false teaching.

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What Writer’s Block Teaches Me About Discipline And Joy

OpenBible John 1My writer’s block continues, tempting me to take a day off from blogging. I do realize that doing so wouldn’t be sinful. Maybe I’d even get some digital art done, which really wouldn’t be such a bad idea.

Yet I fear that indulging these feelings of not wanting to blog could put me on a slippery slope.  I know my sinful, lazy self well enough to understand that I need the discipline of performing tasks regardless of how I feel about them. That same commitment to discipline helped me, 40 years ago, to develop the habit of daily Bible reading.

Admittedly, a Christian should approach God’s Word with eager anticipation, knowing that the Lord speaks to us through the pages of Scripture. It shames me that there are days — way too many of them — when I come to my Bible confessing that I’d rather play Solitaire or work on digital art. Interestingly, those are often the days that His Spirit most clearly illumines His Word to me.

Whether we feel the desire for Scripture or not, we need the daily nourishment it gives. Job certainly understood the value of God’s words.

I have not departed from the commandment of his lips;
    I have treasured the words of his mouth more than my portion of food. ~~Job 23:12 (ESV)

The fact is, Christians need daily Bible intake even more than we need three square meals a day. Sure, there are days when we can only spend five or ten minutes in the Word, and the Lord understands that. But the discipline of coming to His Word regularly, unless unusual circumstances make doing so impossible, establishes a rhythm that ensures daily communication with our Savior.

I disagree with imposing legalistic rules like “No Bible, no breakfast” or reading a specified amount of chapters a day. However, some sort of general routine helps. It’s only when you turn that general routine into rigid law that you pervert godly discipline into ungodly legalism.

And legalistic Bible reading shifts the focus from hearing the Lord to checking off a religious duty to entering into communion with the Living God. Discipline may bring our feelings under control, but it never blocks us from the joy of hearing God’s voice as He speaks through His Word. We may open our Bibles as an act of discipline, but we’ll close them rejoicing that the Lord has spoken to us.

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