Category Archives: Women’s Ministry

Too Serious For A Blog About Roaming Around Boston In Power Wheelchairs

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Boston Public Garden May 2018

Blogs should have a definite focus. A purpose beyond merely writing for the pleasure of writing. Such vanity blogs (as I call them) do attract some followers, I admit, especially if disability features prominently in enough of the posts. But after a spell, the narcissism gets old. Christian bloggers, in particular, begin seeing the need to use their blogs as tools for advancing God’s kingdom.

Three years ago today, I abandoned a blog I’d maintained for nine years. Originally, I began that blog to showcase my digital art, chronicle day trips John and I made into Boston, and reflect on various things the Lord taught me as I transitioned toward Reformed Theology. Toward the end of that blog’s life, I wrote my first  Bible Study series.

In that final month, the Obergefell vs. Hodges decision legalizing same sex marriage gave me reason to believe that Google could shut down my blog, which they hosted on their free Blogger platform. It seemed to me that paying for a WordPress blog might prolong the time I had to blog about the Lord without censorship.

But, to be honest, I’d been contemplating starting a new blog months before Obergefell happened. As much as I delighted in having a blog which allowed me to write whatever struck my fancy, I struggled with a conviction that I needed a focus. And I knew that focus should be determined by the blogs I gravitated toward. That would be my niche.

The blogs I enjoyed most (Do Not Be Surprised, The End Time, Pyromaniacs and Michelle Lesley) all concentrated on exposing false doctrine and encouraging readers to rightly handle God’s Word. Of course, I understood that I’d need to add to their conversation rather than just echo their thoughts, but I felt confident that I could do so.

Over this past three years, the Lord has faithfully given me a unique blogging voice among the esteemed writers in this niche. Convinced the Obergefell has stepped up hostility toward the Gospel that will lead to the persecution of Christians, I’ve worked to equip women for that persecution by pointing to Scripture. I believe that only a firm grounding in the Word of God will get us through persecution, so I write about issues that either draw us away from Scripture or about the wonderful ways Scripture reveals the Lord.

Sometimes, yes, I miss my old blog. As John and I propel our power wheelchairs through the streets and parks of downtown Boston, I occasionally feel a desire to write a narration of our adventures. Boston by wheelchair is fun!

But we live  in serious times, ladies. As fun as it might be to take occasional deviations from the subject matter of The Outspoken TULIP, I remain convinced that we must stay within our boundaries. So we enter this fourth year anticipating more posts that draw us closer to Christ, honoring Him by honoring His Word.

 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. ~~Romans 1:16 (ESV)

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Saturday Sampler: July 8 — July 14

July 1 2010 025Have you ever thought of Bible Study in terms of summer reading? Interesting concept, don’t you think? Leave it to Ryan Higginbottom of Knowable Word to inspire our summer devotional times with Bible Study: Fast and Slow.

We say it over and over, I know. Yet, as  Elizabeth Prata writes in The End Time, evangelical women (and some men) persist in declaring God Told Me! Once again, Elizabeth dismantles the error of direct revelation from God, hoping to convince more women to hear from God on His terms. As a bonus, she includes two 90-second videos; the Mike Abendroth video shouldn’t be missed!IMG_3852

Phil Johnson laments The Rise of Woker-Than-Thou Evangelicalism in Pyromaniacs. If he understands the “woke” phenomenon correctly (and I believe he does), we should be prayerfully concerned.

Who knew that attending a simple baseball game could result in a musing about the eternal ramifications of false teaching? John Chester of Parking Space 23 pulls off just such a feat with It’s Not Just Theology. If you’re someone who rolls her eyes at the mere thought of theology, Chester’s insights might offer you something worth considering.

As a former Charismatic, I well understand The Dangers of Emotionalism that Kelly Smith writes about in Whole Magazine.

Why Didn’t Paul Share His ‘Trip to Heaven’ Story? asks Mike Leake in Borrowed Light. This excellent examination of 2 Corinthians 12:1-10 refutes much of the mysticism that IMG_3889permeates evangelical churches.

Denny Burk writes Is temptation sinful? as an introduction to his new series examining homosexual desire. Can we really differentiate between the desire to sin and the actual sin itself. After reading this first article, I hope you’ll continue reading this series. The Scriptural principles apply to much more than homosexual sin.

I haven’t read Why Can’t We Be Friends by Aimee Byrd, but I’ve read enough of her blog posts on the topic to know that she’s basically objecting to the Pence Rule (Vice-President Pence won’t be alone with any woman other than his wife). In How Can We Be Friends? 4 Biblical and Practical Considerations for Co-Ed Christian Friendships, Michelle July 2012 Boston and Randolph 024Lesley offers an approach to the controversy that few people on either side have mentioned. Her thoughts show exceptional balance and understanding.

Three cheers for Tom Buck, whose guest post in Delivered By Grace encourages the Southern Baptist Convention in particular and Christian churches in general to Stop “Empowering” Woman and Start Equipping them to Biblically Lead. Pastor Buck really gets it right!

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Moving Beyond Beth Moore To The Real Problem

Big Woman

Before you label me a hypocrite for having a blog that men obviously read, please look at the Mission Statement on my sidebar and/or If You’re A Man, Please Read This Page, which is prominently posted on my Menu. Throughout this blog you’ll find subtle, and also blatant, reminders that men should absolutely not be reading my blog. Unlike Beth Moore, I cannot comfortably violate Scripture.

I remember reading that Beth Moore began her teaching career by leading a women’s Sunday School class. Over time, men began sitting in on her class, eventually causing the class to develop into a teaching program open to men as well as women. Since then, while insisting that her passion is women’s ministry, she’s been quite comfortable teaching mixed audiences and even preaching at Passion City Church.

Perhaps, I told myself,  Moore really didn’t mean to teach men any more than I do. My willingness to give her the benefit of the doubt never was all that strong, but it completely flew out the window when her post, A Letter to my Brothers, appeared this past May.

This letter betrays her desire to minister exactly as men do. To her, gender roles signify misogyny. In essence, she’s stomping her high heels in a temper tantrum, demanding to play with the boys.

Egalitarianism is an element of the recent “woke” movement coursing throughout evangelicalism (including the Southern Baptist Convention and Reformed churches). Beth Moore has been “woke” lately, giving her liberty to roar against “injustices” women apparently endure.

For decades, Beth Moore has assured her followers that God speaks directly to her. She hasn’t yet claimed to hear from Him on this particular issue. Yet. But even if she never makes such a claim, her reputation for receiving extrabiblical revelation from God lends enormous credibility to her cries for social justice.

I began this series examining the problems with Beth Moore’s ministry firstly because I’d seldom offered a good demonstration that I understand why she poses a danger to Christian women. Now that I have established my working knowledge of her errors, I feel better equipped to critique her support of the “woke” movement. And, based on her history of disobedience to Scripture’s prohibition regarding women teaching and/or preaching to men, I strongly suspect that she will have a devastating influence that leads women to embrace this movement.

Beth Moore has inserted herself into something that distracts people from the Gospel. We must mourn that someone so popular would help lead people into a theology that divides the Body of Christ under the guise of unifying it.

So from here, I want to move on from discussing her in favor of addressing the egalitarian aspect of the “woke” movement that she espouses. Hopefully we’ll learn how proper gender roles adorn the Gospel.

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What’s My Problem With Beth Moore, Anyway?

Thoughtful Lady

I’ve realized lately that, although I frequently blog about Beth Moore, none of the articles on The Outspoken TULIP  actually explain why I believe she’s a false teacher. I’d written several articles on my old blog (which I’ve since taken down) enumerating some of the serious problems with her teachings. Apparently I moved to this  blog with the erroneous assumption that my readers automatically understood my objections to her ministry. For that oversight, I apologize.

The sheer volume of problems with Beth Moore’s ministry prevents me from adequately addressing them in a single blog post. Additionally, Elizabeth Prata and Michelle Lesley have already provided such excellent resources on Moore that I couldn’t possibly bring anything else to the table. Why reinvent the wheel?

That said, some of you may not have the time to go through all their arguments and documentation. Others of you may think I’m referring you to them because I’m not really as informed as I seem to be, or that I’m blindly parroting Elizabeth and Michelle. For those reasons, let me briefly list a few of my concerns, which I’ll document in future articles.

  • Beth Moore claims to receive personal revelations from God. This fact is probably my greatest objection to her ministry.
  • Beth Moore teaches men as well as women in violation of 2 Timothy 2:12, demonstrating her inability and/or unwillingness to conform to God’s Word. You know — the same God’s Word she supposedly loves and teaches.
  • Beth Moore partners with other false teachers, sometimes praising them as men and women of God.
  • Beth Moore interprets Scripture in narcissistic ways, often ignoring context in favor of her agendas.
  • Beth Moore has recently jumped on the Social Gospel bandwagon, making vague references to her “repentance” from racism as well as accusing the Southern Baptist Convention of systematic misogyny.

Each of my concerns warrants its own blog post. Whether or I address all five concerns remains to be seen, particularly since I’d much prefer to write about the Bible. Sadly, my Bible Studies (which I write to show you correct ways of handling Scripture so that you can spot Beth Moore’s errors for yourselves) are the least read of all my posts, whereas you flock to anything even mentioning her name. Hopefully showing you where she goes wrong will encourage you to pursue healthier Bible study habits.

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Saturday Sampler: June 17 — June 23

Bows SamplerOkay ladies, summer has already made its grand entrance, bringing sizzling temperatures to a large portion of the United States. Hot weather, of course, ushers in the temptation to dress in ways that might not be honoring to the Lord. Kari Dent of living in paradise courageously writes Dear Sisters to speak frankly about our call to modesty.

Rarely can I curate an edition of Saturday Sampler without including something that Leslie A posts in Growing 4 Life. This week’s essay, Simply Broken or Thoroughly Dead? requires us to think Biblically about our relationship with sin and the current trend to call ourselves broken. As usual, you really shouldn’t miss this one!

Women struggle with improper thoughts as much as men do. In response to this reality, Amanda Walker shows strategies for Guarding Your Heart…On Purpose in her latest post for Bible Study Woman. Although her approach isn’t exactly novel, it reminds us to protect our minds from anything that distracts from the Lord.

We could all use the Evangelism Encouragement that Michelle Lesley offers. Praise the Lord for her Scriptural perspective on seeing results when we witness to unbelievers.

Elizabeth Prata, in The End Time, uses an Italian Renaissance painting to demonstrate that  Bad fruit is bad, thus warning us against false teachers. Okay, I’m a sucker for Italian Renaissance art, but Elizabeth’s essay really is worth reading whether you like art or not.

Happy Birthday to Two Faithful Preachers from Erin Benziger. To learn the identities of these two men, and how their ministries parallel each other, go over to Erin’s Do Not Be Surprised blog, which you should read regularly anyway.

Blogging for Stand to Reason, Natasha Crain provides A Parent’s Guide to the 5 Skeptics Who Want to Shame Your Kids for Being Christian. You don’t have to be a mom in order to benefit from Natasha’s counsel, however; each of us encounters these common objections to Christianity.

SlimJim, who blogs at The Domain for Truth, gets it right with Christians Must Grow Deeper In Biblical Doctrines. His assertion is near and dear to my heart. Please read his Scriptural reasoning for making this claim.

Yesterday I started to blog about the upcoming Revoice conference, but after reading As the Serpent Uncoils by Douglas Wilson in Blog & Mablog I’m glad I held off. Doug approaches the controversy with a fresh, but Biblical, perspective that needs to be considered as professing Christians demand to retain homosexuality as their identity.

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Saturday Sampler: June 10 — June 16

Flower SamplerAnswering a question from one of her readers, Michelle Lesley writes The Mailbag: How can I grow to love Jesus more? As she says, more Christians should ask that question.

If you’ve ever tried raising questions about certain popular Christian teachers, you’ll quickly learn that they are The Untouchables. Criticism of them is simply not tolerated by their followers, as Leslie A of Growing 4 Life testifies. She also has an important caution for those who follow Biblically sound teachers.

The purveyor of Biblical Beginnings writes Twisted Tuesday – Cosmic Child Abuse in defense of the doctrine of penal substantiation. I love her passion for the Gospel in this piece, and I wish more Christians would exhibit this kind of passion!

Writing for Unlocking the Bible, Brittany suggests 10 Practical Ways to Treasure Christ based on Psalm 119. Since John and I are currently going through this psalm together in our morning devotions, this blog post particularly interests me. Perhaps the Lord will also encourage you through her insights and ideas.

Josh Buice of Delivered By Grace absolutely nails in his piece, Why Electing a Woman as the President of the Southern Baptist Convention is a Bad Idea. It didn’t happen this year. Let’s pray it never does.

I must recommend a second Michelle Lesley post this week. In Basic Training: The Great Commission, Michelle walks us through a familiar Scripture passage to remind us of Christ’s command to His Church after He rose from the dead. Sadly, many 21st Century evangelicals don’t know what The Great Commission is. Take her poll and then refresh your memory by reading the rest of her article.

On the Ligonier blog, Sinclair Ferguson answers the question, What Is Discernment? I believe more people (particularly those who claim to be in discernment ministry) ought to read his words and give serious thought to them. As I’ve said numerous times, Biblical discernment extends far beyond exposing false teachers.

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Segregated Women

3d383-ladies2bstudy2b03Yesterday I read a blog post by Lisa Robinson. Nothing particularly unusual about that; Lisa displays an excellent command of the English language and (more importantly) shows herself to love the Lord and have sound theology. But I disagreed with the way she defended Legacy, the special gathering for women of color at The Gospel Coalition’s women’s conference this year.

Lisa correctly pointed out that churches very often have various sub-groups such as Junior Church, Youth Group, Single’s Ministry and support groups for people in various types of addiction. And, while I see merit in separating men and women in certain circumstances, I question the wisdom of splintering believers into so many different factions.  Such segregation fragments the Body of Christ into special interest groups rather than encouraging it to unify around our glorious Lord Jesus Christ.

I know some of you are scratching your heads, wondering whether I’m a blazing hypocrite or if dementia is setting in now that I’m mere months away from turning 65. You probably want to remind me of how vehemently I insist that the only men who should read my blog are my husband and the elders of First Baptist Church Weymouth. My parameters probably don’t make much sense, given that I don’t even write about women’s issues.

Okay, I’ve occasionally considered writing about menopause, just to discourage male readers. 🙂

I blog about matters that all Christians, regardless of gender (or anything else), need to understand. Nothing I write applies exclusively to women. Men could most likely learn from some of the things I discuss on this cute little spot of cyberspace. In fact, the men who ignore my pleas to close my blog in favor of blogs written by men indeed have learned things from my writing.

I have only one reason for trying to restrict my writing to women: obedience.

12 I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet. 13 For Adam was formed first, then Eve; 14 and Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and became a transgressor. ~~1 Timothy 2:12-14 (ESV)

Older women likewise are to be reverent in behavior, not slanderers or slaves to much wine. They are to teach what is good, and so train the young women to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled, pure, working at home, kind, and submissive to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be reviled. ~~Titus 2:3-5 (ESV)

I realize that many people believe 1 Timothy 2:12-14 applies specifically to church settings, and they may well be correct. All the same, I prefer to err on the side of caution by confining The Outspoken TULIP to women. My policy is less about creating a separate group within the Body of Christ than about my responsibility to use my gift of teaching in a manner that honors Christ.

So, although Lisa Robinson made an understandable point, I believe breaking Christ’s Body into too many segments fosters unnecessary division. As Christians, let’s focus on our unity around sound doctrine that leads us to Christ.

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