Saturday Sampler: March 17 — March 23

Five Easter Babies

Have you ever heard of Sign Chi Do? Since it’s different from most type of Eastern meditation, you might think Christians can practice it. C.T. Adams evaluates this possibility in Profile 23: Sign Chi Do, an article appearing in Faith Contender. I appreciate this information.

Maybe you’re not moving any time soon. But if you are, consider the advice John Ellis gives in Make Finding a Church a Priority in adayinhiscourt. He presents ideas I wish I’d implemented when I moved from California to Massachusetts.

The lady who blogs at Biblical Beginnings does an outstanding job of confronting a popular misinterpretation of a beloved parable that Christ told.  Twisted Tuesday — The Pearl of Great Price both demonstrates proper hermeneutics and challenges teachings on Christian self-esteem.

In Thy Word Is Truth, Erin Benziger again helps us reflect on the sufficiency of Scripture. We all need reminders of the power of Gods Word. Erin blogs at Do Not Be Surprised.

Quoting at length from a blog post she found on The Masters Seminary website, Amy Spreeman of Naomi’s  Table asks, Do you love the deceived? For those involved in discernment ministry, this question is imperative.

Throwback Thursday ~ 9 Ways NOT to Fight with Your Husband by Michelle Lesley makes me gulp a little because I’ve committed some of these infractions in my own marriage. May I learn to fight fairly, honoring both John and the Lord.

Here’s an interesting perspective on Biblical unity and separation by Mike Ratliff on his blog, Possessing the Treasure. Let’s be careful not to divide unnecessarily, but also not to fellowship with anyone who corrodes the Gospel. Mike gives very helpful guidelines on when and how to separate from those who disobey Gods Word.

I want to list this second post by Michelle Lesley, Feminist Infiltration and the Emasculation of Christian Men, because I’ve seen evangelicals capitulate to the world’s denigration of men. Michelle looks at this problem honestly through the lens of Scripture, offering a powerful and  badly needed corrective that would benefit men as well as women.

Although I haven’t vetted Marci Ferrell’s blog, Thankful Homemaker, I do recommend that you read Dealing with Controversy as a Christian. What a timely and thoughtful piece of writing!

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Repentance On Our Terms — A Mockery Of God

Fear of God

While we must never reduce Old Testament narratives to allegories that we can read ourselves into, these historical accounts instruct us in our own walks with the Lord (see 1 Corinthians 10:6). In reading the book of Numbers, then,  we can learn principles from Israel’s journey to the Promised Land without fancying that we are on a parallel journey.

Sunday I read several chapters of Numbers, going through familiar stories that I’d read many times. Part of my reading covered Chapters 13 and 14, in which Moses records the scouting expedition into Canaan. As God had told them, they found the Land brimming with choice fruits, milk and honey. It was wonderful!

But they also Continue reading

Saturday Sampler: March 10 — March 16

Massachusetts Town Flags

Town and city flags of Massachusetts displayed in the State House

When I started this blog in 2015, I could see that the church in America was headed for persecution. A lot of Christians see the same reality, including Mike Ratliff of Possessing the Treasure. His blog post, Even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness you are blessed, underscores what I’ve been saying all along.

Are You Living with a Misconception of Grace? Writing for Biblical Woman,  Sarah Bubar explores the effect our culture of entitlement has on how we understand the grace of God. She also explains grace from the Biblical standpoint.

She’s done it again! In One major way Christian self-help books damage you, Elizabeth Prata pulls back the cover to reveal a harmful evangelical practice. Ladies, this essay in The End Time deserves your attention!

Candidly admitting her struggles, Debi Martin of Sojourner Between Two Worlds shows us The Importance of Being in God’s Word. I’m currently reading through the Bible in 90 days as Debi did in 2012. It’s my second time doing it, and I highly recommend it.

I appreciate Erin Benziger’s devotional on The Sufficiency of the Word in Do Not Be Surprised. The worldliness permeating evangelicalism pressures people to settle for much less than God has given us.

Scripture delineates specific roles for women that the world considers oppressive. Thankfully, in an article for The Cripplegate, Eric Davis lists 10 Reasons Why the Bible Regards Women Higher than all Other Systems. I wish every evangelical (female and male) would read this one.

Yup, I struggle with reading my Bible too. So Throwback Thursday ~ The Mailbag: I love the Bible, but I have to force myself to read it by Michelle Lesley really reassures and  comforts me. She selects just the right Scriptures to make her case.

I’m not going to give away R. Scott Clark’s message in What Christians Can Learn From Drew Carey About Subverting Culture on the Abounding Grace Radio blog,  but I promise you that you won’t regret reading it. How do I know? I enjoyed reading it, and I’m far from being a Drew Carey fan.

Nick Batzig of Reformation 21 pleads for discernment ministries to strive for balance by writing A Horror of Theology. Bloggers especially need to consider the points he makes in order to avoid extremes that end up dishonoring the Lord.

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When Separation Reveals A Lack Of Discernment

Voice Of God

Why do we embrace division at the slightest hint of disagreement, eager to assign black hats instead of extending charity to people who disagree with us on isolated matters?  Definitely, we must separate from those who seriously deviate from sound doctrine. I don’t advocate partnering  with folks like Beth Moore or Rick Warren. And I’m cautious of certain people in the Reformed camp who make multiple compromises that suggest a doctrinal slide.

To some extent, division is necessary, and even commanded in Scripture. 1 Corinthians 5:11-13 and 2 Corinthians 6:14-18 clearly instruct us to distance ourselves from those who walk in contradiction to the Gospel. Several other passages support this practice. If you read many discernment blogs (even the reputable ones), you’ve seen all the classic verses on this topic.

And I’ll go on record as Continue reading

Saturday Sampler: March 3 — March 9

Flourish 02

Modern evangelicals can certainly complicate Christian life. Thankfully,  in an essay for The End Time entitled Mail Call: Our identity in Christ, Elizabeth Prata injects Biblical reasoning into the question of who we are as Christian women.

In a musing about wanting A Closer Look, Erin Benziger of Do Not Be Surprised draws from a humorous incident at The Cheesecake Factory to show us how abundantly the Lord has blessed us with the ability to know Him.

Curved Twirl Border Yellow

For a reassuring glimpse of God’s sovereignty in directing our decisions, check out Along the right paths by Mark Mclntyre on his blog, Attempts at Honesty.

Kelsey Baker’s When God Doesn’t Do as I Ask in Biblical Woman captures some of the feelings bothering me lately. Interestingly, she uses Psalm 119 to direct our attention to God’s sovereignty in answering our prayers differently than we want. I certainly appreciate God’s timing in bringing this article to me.

Flourish 01

I strongly recommend Mike Ratliff’s Biblically discerning the Lord’s will in Possessing the Treasure. Don’t let his Greek quotations deter you; he always follows them with English translations. And he hits on a fundamental aspect of discerning God’s will.

Don’t you get tired of the assertion that David and Jonathan had a homosexual relationship? I sure do! So I appreciate David, Jonathan, and the Dangers of Reader-Centered Interpretation by J. Alan Branch in For The Church. He provides a clear example of why we must use proper hermeneutics.

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Saturday Sampler: February 24 — March 2

penguin-samplerThankfully, Phil Johnson relies on Scripture rather than the accepted wisdom of the Social Justice Movement in his Pyromaniacs article, One More Plea for Impartiality in That Virtue We Call “Justice”.  If only more of us let the Bible inform our thoughts!

Can you identify The Common Denominators of false religions? If not, Leslie A of Growing 4 Life lays out a helpful and comprehensive outline to assist you in your discernment. As a bonus, she includes a little background on the origin of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Absolutely, Christians need to exercise more civility on social media! But let’s not go to an opposite extreme that causes us to condone sin. In Girl, Same Here! How our desire to be relatable is hurting our morals, Jillian McNeeley cautions against being agreeable when someone is in sin. You’ll find her blog post on Biblical Woman.

Erin Benziger has imported her blog, Do Not Be Surprised, to WordPress recently. I want to welcome this dear friend of mine to the WordPress community by sharing her devotional, The Sufficiency of Christ and His Word. Erin zeros in on a key reason that so many evangelicals lack discernment today.

Praise the Lord for Denny Burk‘s report that African Christians Rescue United Methodists by influencing them not to weaken their official position regarding LBGTQ matters. Will this decision lead to a denominational split? Probably. But how encouraging to see people stand for truth!

You’ll find encouragement from We Never Stop Needing the Gospel by Rebekah Womble of Wise in His Eyes.

Morning by Morning features Brianna Lambert’s piece, The Fruit of Self-Control: What is Your Hungry Soul Telling You? Before you roll your eyes, assuming that she’s just writing another dreary lecture urging us to be good little girls, give her a fair hearing. Her conclusions might not be what you expect!

In Context Matters: Forgetting What Lies Behind, Peter Krol of Knowable Word clears up erroneous teaching on Philippians 3:13 by showing us how this verse relates to everything leading up to it.

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Misapplying Matthew 18:15-20 Constitutes Poppycock

Poppycock

Several years ago, a friend of mine departed from Biblical Christianity, choosing to live in open rebellion against God’s Word. Concurrently, he began blogging about his changing understanding of Scripture, assuring others that “traditional” Christianity taught restrictive values that God never meant to impose on anyone.

I posted comments on a few of his posts, challenging his newfound theology that resulted in the life choices he embraced and advocated. In response, he emailed me demanding that I stop posting comments on his blog. That didn’t bother me in the sense that  bloggers have every right to control what happens on their Comments Sections.

But his follow-up demand indeed disturbed me. He accused me of violating the model for Biblical confrontation that Jesus outlined in Matthew 18:15-20. He said that Continue reading