The Day Of March Has Come

More and more Christians can see where Western civilization is going. We see how our politicians exploit COVID-19 to influence America’s upcoming election, to control human behavior and to clamp down on churches. We shouldn’t really be surprised.

I’m only surprised that the LBGTQ agenda got replaced by COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter as catalysts for social revolution. So much for claiming any prophetic powers, right? Nevertheless, the battle against the Lord and His church has intensified markedly in the past five months. I don’t think any serious Christian can deny that fact.

Voting for people who hold conservative values will reflect our integrity, most assuredly. By all means, let’s use our right to vote as long as we still have it!

But we win the ultimate war by obediently following Christ. And He leads us through His Word, not through political means. When (not if) our politics fail, our eternal King will lead us through each battle His way, all the while teaching us to glorify and honor Him.

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Saturday Sampler: August 2 — August 8

Three Ice Cream Cones

Writing for Knowable Word, Ryan Higginbottom warns that Ignoring Context Can Lead to Heresy as he cites two instances of Jehovah’s Witnesses misusing God’s Word. Pay attention to his warning — it could protect you from falling into false teaching.

I love how Michelle Lesley uses Scripture to support everything she writes. In The Mailbag: Masks in church — Do I submit to my husband or my pastor? she answers a woman with clarity and gentleness. She gives the correct answer, by the way.

Gavin Ortlund recently wrote a blog post criticizing John MacArthur’s defiance against the governor of California. I appreciate Phil Johnson’s respectful, yet firm. response. Not Forsaking the Assembling of Ourselves Together appears in Pyromaniacs, and links to Ortlund’s post in the first paragraph. Thankfully, it corrects a misunderstanding about one of MacArthur’s remarks, giving clarity to the matter.

Math is Not Relative But Critical Theory is, explains Chris Hohnholz of Slave to the King. If you’re confused about what Critical Race Theory is and why it contradicts the teachings of the Bible, you really need to read this piece. Hopefully Chris and his friend Rich Story will follow up on this issue in their Voice of Reason podcast.

As usual, Elizabeth Prata offers a well-documented presentation entitled Mourning the lost — Catholics on The End Time this week. You’ll appreciate her tips and resources for helping Roman Catholic loved ones understand the true Gospel.

HT to Tim Challies for linking to a Reformation 21 article that I somehow missed. Stand in the Day of Trouble by Jeffery Stivason doesn’t whitewash the threats we face as Western civilization dissolves into outright rebellion against God, but he does remind us of our responsibility. This article, ladies, is exactly what I try to communicate through The Outspoken TULIP.

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Flashback Friday: He Said, “Look Mommy — I’m Wearing A Dress!”

Originally published March 29, 2017:

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A few days ago, someone told  me that her three-year-old godson met his mother when she came to pick him up from preschool, greeting her with the words, “Look Mommy — I’m wearing a dress!” Horrified, his mother asked him why he was in a dress. He pointed to his teachers and claimed, “Them gave it to me!”

“Oh no,” the teachers argued, “we gave him a choice. We want our children to use costumes to express themselves.”

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Why I Cover My Head For Church And Why I Don’t Believe All Women Should Cover Their Heads

Photo of me wearing a purple hat

I’m known at my church for my collection of hats. One lady in her 80s looks forward to seeing how I match my hat to my outfit each Sunday. My signature look of wearing hats shifts the attention from my disability, giving me the identity as “the Hat Lady.”

Only a few friends know that I wear hats out of a personal conviction derived from 1 Corinthians 11:

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People Prefer Extremes

Swan Boats at Boston’s Public Garden

Ecclesiates is a difficult little book. I grasp its main meaning, but many of its particulars leave me scratching my head. For example:

15 I have seen everything during my lifetime of futility; there is a righteous man who perishes in his righteousness and there is a wicked man who prolongs his life in his wickedness. 16 Do not be excessively righteous and do not be overly wise. Why should you ruin yourself? 17 Do not be excessively wicked and do not be a fool. Why should you die before your time? 18 It is good that you grasp one thing and also not let go of the other; for the one who fears God comes forth with both of them. ~~Ecclesiastes 7:15-18 (NASB)

I’ve been thinking about verses 16-17 lately because I’ve foolishly gotten into two arguments on Twitter lately. (Yeah, I should know better.) In both cases, I believed people were taking extreme positions, and I thought I should bring a more moderate perspective.

So I have an inflated ego. Hardly a news flash.

As I’ve reflected on my behavior, and perhaps the behavior of the women arguing with me, I noticed something about arguments that I’d forgotten. When people challenge each other, both parties tend to double down and move toward opposite extremes.

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The Fourth Spiritual Law Has The Wrong Emphasis

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If you’ve missed my earlier articles examining The Four Spiritual Laws, you can find them here, here and here. Although I don’t consider this tract to be false doctrine, and I gratefully acknowledge that God has used it in evangelism for at least half a century, I believe it gives an inadequate explanation of the Gospel. Therefore I’ve been taking you through all four laws, encouraging you to evaluate them Biblically.

Today we look at the final Law. It reads: “We must individually receive Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord; then we can know God personally and experience His love.” Okay, that’s probably a good starting place. The wording is technically correct. I’d even say that the writers used John 1:12 and Ephesians 2:8-9 appropriately. And I’m pleased that they recommend reading John 3:1-8.

If they had then moved into a discussion of responding to the Lord with faith and repentance (Acts 2:38, Romans 10:9), things would have been hunky-dorey. But the writers chose to quote Revelation 3:20 — a verse written to Christians who had lost their zeal for the Lord.

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Keys To Discernment: Christ As The Preeminent God

Are we supposed to have favorite verses or passages in the Bible? Probably not.

But I certainly do have a favorite passage, and I won’t apologize for having it! I love that passage because it shows us Jesus as God incarnate — a doctrine that has fascinated me since my first few months as a born-again Christian. 49 years later, the concept still fills me with wonder and adoration, as well it should!

Last week we looked at the first few verses of my favorite passage, exploring how Paul refuted the false teachings of both the Judaizers and the pre-gnostics by proclaiming that Jesus is God. Why don’t we look at the passage again and enjoy the reminder that Jesus Christ indeed is God Himself:

15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things have been created through Him and for Him. 17 He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together. 18 He is also head of the body, the church; and He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that He Himself will come to have first place in everything. 19 For it was the Father’s good pleasure for all the fullness to dwell in Him, 20 and through Him to reconcile all things to Himself, having made peace through the blood of His cross; through Him, I say, whether things on earth or things in heaven. ~~Colossians 1:15-20

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Remembering Where I Come From

About 20 years ago, I developed an interest in genealogy. A cousin on Mom’s side of the family sent me some information going back to our grandmother’s grandfather, who came to America from Ireland in the mid 1800s.

As always when someone investigates their family history, there were things about my great-great-grandfather that disturbed me. Having settled in the South, for example, he fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War (Granny tried to get me to call it The War Between The States). I feel embarrassed that he fought for the side that wanted to preserve black slavery, but I can’t change my heritage.

There are things about my personal past that I can’t change my either. The 17 years of my life before Jesus brought me to salvation may have been characterized by socially acceptable sins like my fascination with the occult (which would have pleased my great-great-grandmother, by the way), but I still rebelled against the Lord. I was headed for hell.

Thankfully, Jesus circumvented my path of self-destruction, convincing me that He took my sin on Himself. As I look back on who I was before His Holy Spirit enabled me to trust in Him as my Savior, I feel even more embarrassed than I do about my great-great-grandfather. But remembering where I came from only increases my gratitude to the Lord. I love Him most when I remember how lost I was without Him.

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Saturday Sampler: July 26 — August 1

Tom of excatholic4christ starts off this week’s Sampler by Reevaluating “saint” Thomas More, terrorizer of Protestants. His post reminds us to acquaint ourselves with church history. Knowing what happened in the past sharpens our understanding of the Church today.

Writing for The Cripplegate, Clint Archer bemoans The Chimera of Cancel Culture that has overtaken society. We should probably think through his points to decide whom we want to boycott.

Being childless (never even having been pregnant), I can’t offer you tips on Talking to Kids About Miscarriage. But Melissa at Your Mom Has a Blog sadly has been in the position of telling her children about their siblings who never experienced life outside the womb. I thought some of you might find this post helpful.

It’s good to see support for the stand John MacArthur took last Sunday. So I love Our Galvanizing Grandfather by Doug Wilson in Blog & Mablog affirming MacArthur’s stance. Too bad more people don’t admire MacArthur for his courage to obey God and not man.

Allen Nelson IV, writing for Things Above Us, provides A Primer on Jacob Arminius, John Wesley, and Charles Finney to give us a better understanding of how evangelical evangelism has developed. He briefly shows why their theology on free will deviates from Scripture.

Of Masks And The Weaker Brothers, which R. Scott Clark posts on The Heidelblog, pretty much reaches the same conclusions that I reached several weeks ago. You may disagree (on either side of the matter) with this conclusion, but I hope you’ll at least give it a fair hearing.

Have you read Elizabeth Prata’s essay on Prophecy and current days in The End Time yet? It may surprise you. I guarantee that it will encourage you. Or your money back!

I’ve been saying for years that teenagers need solid Bible teaching more than they need fun and games. So I love Costi Hinn’s 3 Proven Ways to “Grow” Your Youth Ministry in For the Gospel. I realize that he primarily targets youth pastors, but I think Christians as a whole should consider how we minister to our young people.

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An Eternal Fulfillment Of My Childish Question

Little girl with Matthew 5:8 quote

Some of my childhood memories come back as complete narratives. Every detail remains vivid, as does the progression of events. As a storyteller, I particularly enjoy recounting these memories, though John has heard all those stories so many times that I’m sure he’s sick of them.

Other childhood memories come in fragments, with both moments of sharp detail and many more moments so blurred that I can’t distinguish actual events from my guesses of what might or might not have happened. It’s one of those partial memories that I want to share with you today.

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