What Writer’s Block Teaches Me About Discipline And Joy

OpenBible John 1My writer’s block continues, tempting me to take a day off from blogging. I do realize that doing so wouldn’t be sinful. Maybe I’d even get some digital art done, which really wouldn’t be such a bad idea.

Yet I fear that indulging these feelings of not wanting to blog could put me on a slippery slope.  I know my sinful, lazy self well enough to understand that I need the discipline of performing tasks regardless of how I feel about them. That same commitment to discipline helped me, 40 years ago, to develop the habit of daily Bible reading.

Admittedly, a Christian should approach God’s Word with eager anticipation, knowing that the Lord speaks to us through the pages of Scripture. It shames me that there are days — way too many of them — when I come to my Bible confessing that I’d rather play Solitaire or work on digital art. Interestingly, those are often the days that His Spirit most clearly illumines His Word to me.

Whether we feel the desire for Scripture or not, we need the daily nourishment it gives. Job certainly understood the value of God’s words.

I have not departed from the commandment of his lips;
    I have treasured the words of his mouth more than my portion of food. ~~Job 23:12 (ESV)

The fact is, Christians need daily Bible intake even more than we need three square meals a day. Sure, there are days when we can only spend five or ten minutes in the Word, and the Lord understands that. But the discipline of coming to His Word regularly, unless unusual circumstances make doing so impossible, establishes a rhythm that ensures daily communication with our Savior.

I disagree with imposing legalistic rules like “No Bible, no breakfast” or reading a specified amount of chapters a day. However, some sort of general routine helps. It’s only when you turn that general routine into rigid law that you pervert godly discipline into ungodly legalism.

And legalistic Bible reading shifts the focus from hearing the Lord to checking off a religious duty to entering into communion with the Living God. Discipline may bring our feelings under control, but it never blocks us from the joy of hearing God’s voice as He speaks through His Word. We may open our Bibles as an act of discipline, but we’ll close them rejoicing that the Lord has spoken to us.

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